Bet You Didn’t Know This

In America, the word we have to describe when one person cradles inside another is “spoon.” You can even use it as a verb, as in, “I like spooning.” This term does not exist in other countries, such as Brazil.

In Brazil, they compare the cradling to oysters. If you want to tell a Brazilian person you want to spoon, say, “I want to lay like oysters.” No joke.

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Jay Gatsby
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Jay Gatsby
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And never give the “OK” sign with your fingers and thumb in a circle to a Brazilian….

surfallday
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surfallday
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but in soviet russia the spoon eats you

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Reversal

good post roosh, i just could not resist smile

Yeders
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Yeders
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yeah. spooning in Australia is the same as American spooning by the looks of it.

surfallday
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surfallday
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also the link doesnt really offer an example of the whole oyster thing – like – how would you actually say that?

im asking because this could be a great standalone bit preceded by a “wanna hear something interesting? and totally yea random….”

CR
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CR
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Ok, the Brazilian here cannot remember for the life of me any reference to oysters for spooning in Brazil. Does anyone know how is it said in Portuguese, because “I want to lay like oysters” doesn’t ring a bell…

Jo
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Jo
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Yeah it sounds weird to me too, CR. I can’t come up with it.

CR
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CR
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I’m thinking the Brazilian girl was *maybe* making fun of you so you’ll make a fool of yourself when you make your way down there?

Just saying…

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[…] more thing. Remember when I wrote that Brazilians refer to spooning as “lying like oysters?” I was close—it’s actually to lie like seashells. With the Brazilian girls I met […]

Aris
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Aris
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The expression is “Dormir de conchinha”.
Concha is shell. Conchinha is the diminutive for shell (tiny, small shell).
And it’s definitly not used as a verb.