Four Months Update

I feel like I’m seeing too much for one man. My brain is so constantly stimulated with newness that I’m nervous back home I’ll go through withdrawal and just curl up in my dad’s basement. Unfortunately it flooded after I left so I may have to deal with some mold smell.

I’ve realized that my ambition, as judged by an American woman lawyer, is zero. Which means I will never experience amazing sex with a lawyer. I thought after some time I’d get an itch for the lifestyle back home but I still have no interest in having a “real” job, and the only itch I get is from bed bug bites. If I can live comfortably out of a 45-pound backpack for four months, only buying things that need replacing like socks and toothpaste, then there is no other possession I need in life. Things are so simple now—I just worry about my health, people I care about, and how I’m going to challenge and entertain myself. Until the money runs out, anyway.

There is an American I met here that stayed for only two weeks and everyone was shocked his trip was so short. “Typical American vacation,” I thought, “I had to do that.” We’re the greatest empire in the world, albeit a struggling one, but from my sample size we travel less than every other Western European country except Italy. We are looked upon by others as working too much and not getting out of the country, and it’s true because our idea of a vacation is usually the beach for the weekend. For the population we have in the U.S., there should be twenty times more of you down here travelling with me, but money and status are so ingrained in our culture that taking time off from making money to travel with few possessions in basic accommodations and challenging environments just doesn’t make sense. Plus that gap in your resume would ruin your carefully planned career path.

It looks like I will have more money leftover than I thought so when I return home I can continue the bum / slacker / coffeeshop lifestyle I left behind. It was the best time of my life, without a job, without a car, having deep conversations with my dad, eating Persian food everyday, watching my little brothers grow up, getting more action than I’ve ever gotten, waking up at 11am, thinking writing reading, swimming laps in the neighborhood pool. I can’t tell you how this compares until I’m done, until the parasites or whatever in my stomach passes through my system, and even then I’m not sure if you can compare a life that was stable with one that is constantly changing and over-stimulating with roller-coaster ups and down like a manic depressive. One day I’m in the gutter fantasizing about my airplane landing in Dulles, the next I’m researching how much apartments here cost.

On Christmas I will be around Montevideo (pronounced mon-tay-vi-DAY-oh) and then Punta del Este for New Years. I’m tired but there is still a lot left to see.

Gym & Chicken
Gym and chicken

Related Posts For You

newest oldest most voted
Sudamericana
Guest
Sudamericana
Offline

Oh my god… taking a picture next to that sculpture was so tacky in a touristy kind of way that you would never have caught me doing it. But I miss Punta del Este so much that I would totally do it if I only had the chance. I envy you so much!

You will not miss another curiosity, the ondulating bridges in La Barra. There used to be only one of them, but they thankfully constructed another, because traffic was unbeareable once the area turned popular. My car broke just before passing the old bridge once, when everyone was going to the beach… I was the driver, and it was one of the most stressful moments in my life. Other than that, La Barra brings me great memories. Typically, when I was a kid, my dad would wait until the bridge was not too crowded and sped up, to give us that roller-coaster feeling. La Barra later came to symbolize butterflies in the stomach for other reasons (stalking guys I had crushes on at the bars/clubs there!).

Sorry for the digression. Please understand that I am living through you right now… 🙁

Sudamericana
Guest
Sudamericana
Offline

Oh, I was forgetting… do not leave Punta without having churros con dulce de leche in “Manolo”. Yummy…

Sally
Guest
Sally
Offline

Most Americans use their precious 10-12 days of vacation time (accrued, of course) and money to visit their families, usually elsewhere in the U.S. I guess if you don’t like your family and don’t have to support anyone but yourself, it’s pretty easy to take off to a foreign country for a couple of weeks.

Bobby Rio
Guest
Bobby Rio
Offline

It always amazed me to how few Americans I see in south america. Even my friends, who have heard my wild tales, and watched the videos, and who swear they will go… never seem to make it. They would rather drop $600 a MP3 player to entertain them then experiece something new and exciting.

I always say the biggest thing I love about traveling is waking up, looking around, and thinking “Where the fuck am I”

Wouldn’t the ideal life be to make enough money from blogging and writing books just keep doing what you’re doing.

Fuck I still haven’t seen Asia…

Bobby Rio’s last blog post: Neil Strauss Interviewed about ?Rules of the Game?.

KT
Guest
KT
Offline

You should check out Colonia in Uruguay. If you take the ferry from BA to Uruguay, it may dock in Colonia. At least mine did. Colonia is a great little town right on the water, which is a great place to rent a scooter and tour around for a few hours….

roissy
Guest
roissy
Offline

the seed of a manifesto is in this post.

mike says
Guest
mike says
Offline

Can’t wait to see how this trip impacts your life and writing upon return.

shadi
Guest
shadi
Offline

i find it interesting that a lot of guys these days opt to travel for a few years after schooling to do some soul-searching (and/or to avoid “the real world”). you’re the 4th guy i know that has gone off for a year or two to sort out what he wants out of life and a career because his biggest fear is to return to a 9-5 cubicle prison where he’s someone’s bitch. and just like the other guys, the soul-searching has definitely expanded your worldly knowledge but definitely not brought you closer to an answer on what to do upon your return.

power to you, i would have done what you’re doing but i can’t. soak it all in, roosh.

secret asian man
Guest
secret asian man
Offline

I had the same realization a couple years ago.

I used to be a desk-bound, buck-chasing yuppie. Now I’m an airline pilot. I don’t make that much money, but I get a cool international vacation once every two months.

Eric
Guest
Eric
Offline

I have a very small family: Only one grandmother left, one Aunt that I contact with any frequency, my sister, my mom, and my dad. My parents divorced two years ago and haven’t spoken since. I’m sometimes jealous of people with large families, but at the same time, having almost no family gives me so much freedom. I spent a semester in Prague during my senior year and just finished my application to Charles University in Prague to start in September ’08. I have been so inspired by your trip to SA that I’ve decided to do something similar if I get accepted to my program: I’m going to fly out to Europe two months before school starts and try to see as much as I can.

I think the thing that probably keeps most Americans anchored to their communities is family. I look at some of the friends I have that are already married at 23 and couldn’t imagine being in their shoes. It’s nice to have stability, but you only get one chance to experience the world in your twenties. Going on a family vacation to Europe/South America/Southeast Asia/wherever and living there for a few months as a twenty-something are two fundamentally different experiences.

Eric’s last blog post: Field of Green.

D
Guest
D
Offline

when you started on this trip I wanted to hear all about the girls you were going to lay. I have since turned to wanting to get out of my cubicle lifestyle and travel. Pussy will come when it comes huh?

Wendy
Guest
Wendy
Offline

One of your best posts yet.

Wendy’s last blog post: Arms Set On Fire By Rainstorm, Highlights at Ten.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
Offline

Good post Roosh. I am an Australian and like most aussies we all love to travel to different places, and remember, to get to Europe of the americas it is at least at 20 hour flight and really expensive. But most still do it. I have always been amazed at the lack of USA tourists when I go places as well. I think a lot of it may be the 10 days annual leave issue as Aus has 4 weeks a year and most of Europe has 5 weeks. The US system seems far too commercial with little rights for the workers that restricts time off and focuses on corporate profit and making sure you have a complete resume.

Down here, employers will ask why you have not gone abroad if there is not gap in the resume rather than the other way around.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
Offline

meant to say ‘or’ the americas…

Gunslingergregi
Guest
Gunslingergregi
Offline

Roosh,
Congrats!!! man you did what you said you were going to do. Imagine though that You can take a few years and pay for that kind of living permanent but “like” with an income each month lol. It is not as hard as you would think. I am almost done just one more year and it is party time. (ok maybe 2)

Gunslingergregi
Guest
Gunslingergregi
Offline

To Shadi,
If you play it right you don’t have to go back to the “real” world. Just do some time at indentured servitude without the pretend freedom of buying stuff making you feel like hey look I’m making choices I have a life and anyone can make it.

Dasha
Guest
Dasha
Offline

Great post Roosh!! I am living vicariously through you until I head down to Colombia.

As for traveling, some of the people I have met who are around my age (22), americans, seem a little aprehensive about traveling. I mentioned to someone that I am going to Colombia and they were like aren’t you going to get kidnapped? Sometimes I feel this is how most Americans decide where to travel, if it looks bad on TV it must mean they hate Americans. Its sad that people are too lazy to look up information themselves. As long as you dont wear the Old Navy American flag shirt and travel with an open mind, you will be fine, then again there are freak accidents sometimes, but they are rare.

Roosh, I bet you could get a job down there, teaching English (if thats your thing) or hell, start a business in the tourism/travel sector Lonely Plantet meets Bang…Roosh Style