Giving Up vs Failure

A lot of you have embarked on certain goals in life, didn’t get that goal, and then felt like you failed. I’m here to tell you that you didn’t actually fail—you gave up. Failure is when success would have been impossible no matter what else you did. Giving up occurs well before that.

Failure involves genuine tears, punching holes in the wall (or at least wanting to), and a feeling of total defeat that puts you in a real depression. It’s when you’ve tried absolutely every option humanly available to you after untold hours of effort but still could not accomplish what you wanted. It’s when you’ve reached the point where there is nothing else you could do to get one step closer to your goal.

Giving up occurs well before failure, when you quit before all options were exhausted. You’re bummed about it, but it doesn’t shake your emotions or cause you to lose any sleep. Giving up also involves rationalization, whereby you try to convince yourself that you didn’t really want the goal anyway, that it’s too much work for apparently too little gain (sour grapes). This is a self-protection mechanism that is useful because most humans would have their core shattered if they truly believed they failed in something.

Most of you reading right now have not failed at anything in life, and this is a problem because you stopped pursuing your goal before it was certain you could not achieve it. You stopped because you were scared of failing. You were fearful of realizing that you are a mere mortal man that can not possibly achieve everything you set out to do. You want to go to sleep at night thinking you’re not a loser, but instead you’re someone who gave up too soon, didn’t reach the limits of your potential, and received less benefits of your one and only existence. Or maybe you’re just too lazy. Maybe you bought into the culture of entitlement that says the pleasures of life should come fast by pushing a few buttons on a smartphone. Either way you’re not a failure, you’re a quitter.

I look at my past “failures” and am upset at myself. They weren’t true failures, and that has hurt me more than helped. There were a hundred more things I could have done to keep going, but I took the easy way out. I complained that it was too “hard,” that it wasn’t worth it, and I instead moved on to something easier that didn’t challenge my abilities as much. I went to sleep with still a positive impression of myself because technically I didn’t fail, but what good does that do me? How do I know what I’m truly capable of? How do I know where my strengths and weaknesses lie? I don’t know, because lately I’ve been letting my ego win when it encounters just a bit of difficulty that may suggest he’s not a winner in life.

True failure is tough to handle. You won’t feel good about it, and for the short term you may even feel less of a man, but I promise that you learned nearly as much in that failure than if you had succeeded, and definitely more than if you simply would have given up. This knowledge will help you on your next goal. It surely won’t be obvious, but any man that pushes to his absolute limits will be able to handle anything else in life with just a bit more ease than if he didn’t know where the line was.

For the past couple of years, especially in 2014, I’ve been coasting along, living the easy life. Sure I have my cold streaks and set backs like anyone else, but I haven’t failed because I haven’t given it everything I have. Maybe I need to fail in something—truly fail—and by dumbfounded at my failure. Maybe we all need to fail, to find what we’re made of, to come out that much stronger on the other side.

Read Next: Mountain Is Nothing

Related Posts For You

newest oldest most voted
YosarriansRight
Guest
YosarriansRight
Offline

Life is how we handle what’s thrown at us – the good and the bad. Being able to adapt, improvise and overcome is an integral part of separating success from failure. That’s why being both intelligent and secure enough in oneself is required to succeed. Part of that intelligence and security is not giving up or failing, but learning and moving forward.

seth datta
Guest
seth datta
Offline

Learning to adapt means intrinsically being a penis-less corporate whore in a game that does not have more than a few decades left to run if even that. Because no man is an island and we live in an interdependent economy and society, adaptation and improvisation is not as important as toeing the line to the moneyed interests (to survive in the short term – in the long term this is even more destructive). As such, being ‘adaptable’ means being mediocre and not threatening those in the hierarchy above you with your skills – this is what I see in healthcare today and is hardly a sign of someone who is truly adaptable, as opposed to someone who is a gimp earning a pay check till they get inevitably fucked over, all the while they hope they die before being put into some old folks home, presuming those are still around ten years from now, with the way things are.

Most people are blind to things which do not affect them, so when they fall unexpectedly by the same sword that felled another, it comes to their surprise. Then they end up homeless or worse.

Atlanta Man
Guest
Atlanta Man
Offline

solid post.

Sean
Guest
Sean
Offline

What areas in A town are good for day and night game?

Atlanta Man
Guest
Atlanta Man
Offline

Day-Lenox Mall, Midtown, Virginia Highlands, Emory area, and Little Five Points
Night- Buckhead, and Midtown, Virginia Highlands. Clubs-MJQ, Midtown area nightclubs(avoid urban clubs or anywhere they pat you down at the door).

Sean
Guest
Sean
Offline

What neighborhood would but good for a studio apt for optimal logistics to all of these spots (or ate war to where the white blonde girls are mainly at)?

seth datta
Guest
seth datta
Offline

Interesting point – with the white female birth rate at 1.2 per female (I believe) and the rampant degeneracy, in 10 years time, what would be the demographic of the few middle class areas with attractive white females? I’d imagine there would be few around – the UK is certainly like this in many places already, so this would also impact on the future dating market which would be shit, to say the least.

This is even ignoring the fact that few out of that attractive market would be LTR material.

Atlanta Man
Guest
Atlanta Man
Offline

Get a place in Midtown or Buckhead.

Sean
Guest
Sean
Offline

Virginia Highlands-what kind of people are in that area mainly (hipster, urban, money, corporate, etc)?

What club has great trance and house music (not into urban/gangster rap) great drinks and good ratios?

Where can I find some stacked cougars looking for younger guys?

Atlanta Man
Guest
Atlanta Man
Offline

Virginia Highlands=White people of every kind (No Urban clubs at all)
Grant Park= Hipsters (only one Urban Club)
Buckhead=Old white country southern money
Midtown=Trendy upperclass white, urban, some hipster, a little overpriced
Illegal After parties=they are everywhere, word of mouth to find them. Separated by types of people, not necessarily race. All are basically open air drug markets, no risk of violence at non urban ones.

Go to Creative Loafing.com for Atlanta and they have all the info on everything cool in Atlanta. Cannot help you with the cougars cause I don’t really know (not into older chicks since the age of consent in Georgia is 16 so there is no need)

Conrad Stonebanks
Guest
Conrad Stonebanks
Offline
seth datta
Guest
seth datta
Offline

The above is an important truth! Sadly, many so-called ‘alphas’ in business and life are merely the mediocre grade-C talent of the human race. The grade A of the west was killed off a while back, whilst people partied in the hedonistic dying phase, and now the grade-B is being removed at an alarming rate. Because all of this is due to a socially engineered society, I question the existence of an alpha male, as such a man who is a degenerate female’s wet dream (reinforcing each others’ degeneracy), who himself contributes to the decline of his own society and race, where in the end he himself would be fucked up the ass by his government/corporations/foreigners/others – this surely cannot be an alpha male.

The top 3-5% (not just 1%) of society in the west are a big joke, benefitting from a huge wealth confiscation scam from the other 95-97%. The only problem is that many of the ‘masses’ are too stupid to see that they are contributing to this very problem which will destroy everyone, including the ones at the top who think they will get away with it, but won’t (but only after everyone else is destroyed will they fall too, despite their plans). The work of the masses was used in the past to enslave and destroy the grade-A of the west, while the masses had their ‘bread and circus’ in our modern version of Rome, all the time they partied as their fellows were destroyed – never once imagining that the consequences of this would come back to haunt them badly.

TJ
Guest
TJ
Offline

Sometimes they are dead ends and it is valuable to realize that and go in another direction.

Texeira
Guest
Texeira
Offline

Roosh
Why don’t you try something next to impossible like moving to Hollywood and trying to be another Sean Connery or George Clooney (those are two stars with personas similar to yours). Or maybe get an MBA from the London School of Economics and try to be like George Soros or an corporate exec that way when you’re 55 and in Moscow you can take Irina the 23yo out in a Ferrari or on trips to Fiji with your provider game. Or maybe at your age try to look like Brandon Carter or Joey Gloor- totally jacked.

john
Guest
john
Offline

No MBA for Roosh. He’s against formal education since they indoctrinate you with feminist ideas.

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

I don’t think Roosh is after fame and money. He already has that and enjoys what the commodities they bring. I think he is after finding the meaning of life.

Texeira
Guest
Texeira
Offline

I doubt Roosh is a multi millionaire- he could be if be had marketed $399 DVD/cd sets or online packages of videos like RSD Owen Midget or Julien Metrosexual/Ross Jeffries/David De Anushole/Style aka Connected N Chicago Jew Trust Fund Man etc

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

Funny. I never said he was a millionaire. But I think he’s doing pretty good for himself. He’s specially intriguing because alphas are seldom introspective, aware of their egos and how these shape their realities and confident enough to show their vulnerabilities.

Jannik Thorsen
Guest
Jannik Thorsen
Offline

I dont think this is correct. Many of the most succesfull people of are quite introspective. They have to be if they want to think out of the box or if they are willing to take huge risks in order to succeed with something extraordinaire.
That these people do not post their most intimate thoughts for public display, does not imply that they are not introspective. Some of them just prefer to keep their thoughts for themselves.

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

You make sense but it’s difficult for me to see Donald Trump as an introspective man aware of his ego’s power over him.

Jannik Thorsen
Guest
Jannik Thorsen
Offline

Perhaps not, maybe he is an example of the opposite. I dont think he necessarily is the rule however. I think there is far more introspection going on. Especially as these type of people get older.

Conrad Stonebanks
Guest
Conrad Stonebanks
Offline

“Or maybe get an MBA from the London School of Economics”

Investing time, energy, and money in the academic system could be one of the worst mistakes any man can make these days, especially if one already has a college degree licence to work, like Roosh. The ROI of going back isn’t good.

seth datta
Guest
seth datta
Offline

If you are not in the mentality of sucking corporate cock, that MBA may be useless. I dispute the existence of alpha males in most careers, including business. The ones running the country are usually the ones said to be the alpha males, and in the UK (as in most other places) we are run by insane maniacs (who also happen to be pedophiles).

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

Roosh,

Personal question, do you consider Anna a failure?

Roosh_V
Guest
Roosh_V
Offline

No. I wasn’t ready to commit to her. If I am ready in the future, I will not regret passing on her but the bad luck in not being ready when a good woman was ready for me.

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

I think the only way we can truly fail is by defeating all of our fears. Our fears protect us from failure.

Jannik Thorsen
Guest
Jannik Thorsen
Offline

Perhaps you were scared of commiting. Or perhaps you are afraid of failing in a LTR.
Isnt the phrase “I am not ready” just an excuse for putting off commitment indefinetily? Couldnt this be construed as yet another rationalization for not doing something?

seth datta
Guest
seth datta
Offline

The world is run by moneyed interests who have a stranglehold on many key sectors, banking obviously, but also healthcare, military, communications etc..

I would like to address the last one, communications, here; it has come to my attention that Obama and the FCC are debating a ‘free internet bill’ against the corporations such as Verizon, Comcast etc.. The real problem is that both Obama/FCC and the corporations are run by the super-rich, so no matter whatever talking points both groups push forwards, they are essentially saying ‘bye bye free speech’ and ‘hello higher internet connection prices’.

That this should happen in the land of the ‘free’ is awful (not that it’s been free for awhile now), for it will spread to the world, but affects america and the west the most – essentially, you can be fined or given jail for any comments you make online deemed by the self appointed authorities to be ‘offensive’. It may even be retrospective! This may make employment impossible for some in future, but the rest would eventually suffer the same crushing tyranny. Worse still, this means that any resistance there would be to tyranny would be gone as there would be no way to organise. And you would live your life as a slave, and to be expendable when the jobs inevitably dry up as fat cats get richer – all the while, you would be taxed to the hilt if you wanted to startup your own internet business due to the regulation, so the only way you could make money would be through the banksters-corporation-government cartel; and they would spend every day abusing their slaves to keep them in line.

We have had a massive change on the western front over the past decade or so – financial collapse, multiple wars in the middle east, mass corporate-government sponsored immigration, and repressive measures taken against domestic populations. I am one to believe in God for all of this had been spoken of in many religions, including Christianity, but I hope that you believe in something bigger than faith in our fellow human beings, which has led us to the point we are at today.

Mosby
Guest
Mosby
Offline

Among other things, I’m a medic. There are times when you exhaust every option and you still loose.

I’m a lot more comfortable with that than if I gave up.

Sometimes in this world the answer is “No.”

You gave it your best.

What irks me is if in hindsight I realize I didn’t exhaust all options. (In other things, mostly biz and girls, never medicine…) That to me is failure.

jared thompson
Guest
jared thompson
Offline

It is easy to feel cheated in life, as we often are, and the injustice we feel is because if we had not been cheated, we would have gotten that job or deal, or even closed that girl.

So you make an important point – that it’s important to know that you gave it your best, and have to accept that what is fated for you will be, and let the frustration/pain go. This is life, and many people in history and currently in third world nations never had or will have what we had in the west.

Mosby
Guest
Mosby
Offline

Indeed.

The letting go aspect is a learned skill and habit.

Today I am pretty quick to start looking for the next open door when another closes. Failure to do so wastes alot of time and energy.

Mike
Guest
Mike
Offline

38 years into my life I’m still struggling to find something (non-habitual) that inspires me to keep going onto success or failure, instead of just settling for good enough (result, skill level, knowledge etc.) or losing interest or (much more rarely) hitting the point of frustration or difficulty where I give up before I got anything useful or tangible out of my efforts.

Since I’m not prone to depression I guess I’m just mostly satisfied but not necessarily quite happy with “coasting through life”. Although typically a few times a year I do feel I’m missing some kind of greater life purpose. Then I usually embark on something new that seems inspirational – and after a while lose interest or give up, or incorporate it into my life at “good enough” level.

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

Mike, The apathy you’re speaking of is an endemic phenomenon of millennials. Is there a cure?

Mike
Guest
Mike
Offline

Obviously I haven’t found one. And one thing getting in the way of that particular condition – for me and others inflicted with it – is that the acceptable level of satisfaction that persists most of the time, dulls the inclination to work really hard looking for that cure.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not the type who’s satisfied with a life consisting of regular meals, a bland, steady girlfriend and three hours of mind numbing TV every night before bed time. But none of my more interesting and productive activities manage to inspire me to greatness.
I travel (even relocated to another country two years ago where I still live), but I don’t aspire to do much more than sightseeing and general hedonism when I’m in a new place. I won’t be hiking around the world or writing a book about penguins during two chilly months in a tent in Antarctica.

I enjoy mountain hiking and even have a bit of fun when climbing when there are some rocks in the way. And while it’s quite likely I’ll be taking a slightly more challenging tour in a place like Nepal within the next couple of years, I have no desire to push my body and mind to the limits by trying to climb Mt. Everest or just a more moderate task like attempting to do a tough multi-day hike in (near-)record time.
I just like walking and nature. And maybe take some photos of beautiful scenery. That 10,000 people have already taken before me – from slightly different angles and with different photo filters and weather conditions – and uploaded to Facebook and Tumblr or whatever.

I love reading and studying. But I never get absorbed by a single topic – broad or narrow – and strive to understand or utilize it to its fullest with the determined and focused mind of a scholar or a scientist. I just like knowing a little about a lot of things.

I love working out – I’ve been lifting most years since I was in my mid teens. But aside from usually working as had as I can in an individual training sessions, I don’t aspire to get “jacked” (leaving aside that my genes seem to limit me to merely athletic without strong enhancements) or to keep pushing my max bench press to new heights.
I’m just satisfied with being in good shape.

I wouldn’t mind fucking 8s and 9s (who would) but I’m not willing to put in the hard work required to make that happen as more than a stroke of mostly random luck. I’m happy enough fucking 5s and 6s and the occasional 7.

But despite all that I can’t deny there’s still that longing for a larger purpose. I just doesn’t feel like climbing Mt. Everest, fucking the hottest girl in the club or publishing a book on previously undiscovered mating habits in penguins, would satisfy that longing for me (assuming I wouldn’t get bored or give up before getting close to achieving those results) to a much greater degree than the much more modest things that keep me mostly satisfied.

ATC
Guest
ATC
Offline

Obsessively pursuing tasks outside of professional athletics is actually a symptom of nerdiness. A lot of us study Game because our nerdiness OBSTRUCTS us from deciphering normal social interaction. If that is not your case, count your blessings.

The thing is, trying a bang a 10 is something that you can do right now. Becoming a penguinologist or extreme mountain climber, not so much.

Will
Guest
Will
Offline

What about having children?

Mike
Guest
Mike
Offline

I’m not ready to give up most of my personal freedom yet – not convinced I’ll ever be. Even less ready than usual after spending two weeks living under the same roof as my 10 months old nephew during the Christmas holidays with family.

Chris Brony
Guest
Chris Brony
Offline

I have a similar feeling. But with me its more about a series of set backs over a period of a year or so which has totally taken away my energy and confidence to achieve success in anything. And anything i try seems to follow the same path. And now i tend to bail out or expect failure from a very early stage.

I wonder if those muslims who go and fight for isis in the Middle East are in some ways just escaping from the boredom of modern life and living like a lion for several month or years.

Elroy
Guest
Elroy
Offline

Roosh
Do you think your aging has hurt your game in the West some?
I mean have you ever seen a 40yo dude walk into a dance club in America- they patrons are snotty.

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

Roosh is not in America. Is it even worth to game women here?

NSA fan here
Guest
NSA fan here
Offline

If you are the Frat Bro type and add status to her life, or a young enough obviously smart musicians etc, American women are really fun sluts. I’ve never met girls so willing to call me Master and Daddy, and to call themselves sluts while they fuck you in order to debase themselves for you.

The thing you’ve got to give Americans is if they accept a job, they usually do try to do their best at it!

Sluttiness with a smile!!!

Andrea
Guest
Andrea
Offline

So I guess it is worth it. Lol

chicago1
Guest
chicago1
Offline

Great article. This shows than we need to place less stigma on the word “failure” and much more so on “quitter”. And the worst connatation should belong to “sitting on the sideline” for the people who don’t even begin an endeavor.

ohwell
Guest
ohwell
Offline

It’s time for you to give up, finally. Look at yourself, “Daryush Valizadeh”: weak skinny wuss–the bitterness you ooze, is it what prevents you from building muscles, like normal guy who has testosterone can? Why are you so bitter…did people make much fun of your name when you were growing up? You just don’t cut it, so give up. Soon you’ll be a bitter old lonely dimeless man.

CallMeAl
Guest
CallMeAl
Offline

The comments section is usually where the wackos hang out, but you guys have posted some really interesting, insightful comments. I read all of them.

Jon
Guest
Jon
Offline

I’m getting automatic redirects from return of kings to a placeholder site. That’s for every page that I visit on the site. Just to let you know.

ImTellinYa
Guest
ImTellinYa
Offline

Ha ha. That’s the honest truth what you wrote there. A couple of times in my life I’ve slammed my head against the wall and finally given up, only to stand there and watch the wall collapse. It’s a good feeling, but it doesn’t lessen the temptation to give up sometimes anyway. Other times I patiently and persistently keep a goal in mind and work on it in a desultory fashion and actually feel confident that at some point the light bulb will go off. Sometimes it does. Usually it does in some way.

Other times I enjoy staying in the rut. It’s all good. I don’t know if I’ve truly failed yet by your definition. Sometimes failure is useful because the goal is simply a mirage. The one thing I’ve learned from all this is that many things in life are a mystery and will remain that way. The trick is to be more or less comfortable with that. My two cents. I read your stuff all the time, but I don’t think I’ve ever commented before.

I like a lot of those film noir guys who know the deck is stacked against them and who even have the self awareness that it’s their own character flaws that rattle their cool. But they enjoy the ride even if it makes them bugs. Of course it helps if you’re self-destructing with Jane Greer. She wouldn’t give most geeks a change of expression.

Have you written about film noir? I’d be interested in what you see.

David
Guest
David
Offline

Don’t you think you kinda contradict your other post here:

http://www.rooshv.com/the-paradox-of-success

“I understand that the seed of unhappiness is planted whenever I set out to achieve a goal, and that when that goal is achieved, I will enter a dip that can not be effectively combated with further goal seeking. Instead I will accept the hangover that results, right myself with dutiful work that busies my mind and body (writing, reading, fitness), and proceed with life until the hangover passes. I will accumulate wisdom from achieving the new goal, and appreciate the positive improvement to my being, but I know that my long-term happiness will not budge because of it. We are all outfitted with a program where success does very little for us in the grand scheme of life. Maybe this is too bad for us, but the sooner we accept that fact, the better off we’ll be.”

If we know that success won’t bring happiness, why bother?

Success is such a bullshit word anyways, results in the real world are often beyond our control and aren’t based on actual talent.

I don’t think “success” should be part of any man’s life.

Roosh_V
Guest
Roosh_V
Offline

“If we know that success won’t bring happiness, why bother?”

Because a lack of movement (i.e. doing nothing) is more consistent in decreasing happiness than success. You must have the correct expectations of what success can bring and how we adapt to new achievements.

David
Guest
David
Offline

Well then the lack of movement is the problem, not the lack of success. The idea of moving towards goals without needing them to succeed or fail seems to be the answer here.

This is why religions are so huge. It fulfills mans need to work on something without having to care about whether there are real world results or not. This attitude, ironically, must be why religions are so damn successful.

Roosh_V
Guest
Roosh_V
Offline

Is it possible for forward movement not to bring even a little success that can be measured as an improvement?

So forward movement will lead to success and at least short term happiness. Backwards movement leads to failure and at least short term sadness. Success and movement therefore has much overlap.

gfxndg
Guest
gfxndg
Offline

This is a great post Roosh. I’ve recently been feeling a bit down as I’m in my 30s and feel like I got into game too late. No point wishing that I didn’t know about it when I was younger when I was surrounded by chickydees at college. This post has encouraged me to work harder and eventually get laid.

Alcibiades303
Guest
Alcibiades303
Offline

What’s even harder is persisting through a failure repeatedlly. Some would call that intensity, others might name it passion. As you stated, Roosh, most people genuinely fear the cliff. Ego coddles and tempts and ensares us within a sense of false security. The leap of faith into the unknown, ie., off the edge, is the true test. Either your ego loosens its grip or begins a pathology that requires therapy. If the latter occurs, you’ve waited too long to individuate yourself and own your identity. The demonic catatonioa of failure, the voice that whips and lashes, is just a teacher. It’s up to you to pierce through the veil.

“Only great pain, the long, slow pain that takes its time… compels us to descend to our ultimate depths… I doubt that such pain makes us “better”; but I know it makes us more profound.” – Nietzsche

Liberty City Man
Guest
Liberty City Man
Offline

Roosh Roosh,
Are you ever going to Southeast Asia?

Ps-I think you need trt for depression. Get some trt and you won’t be so cynical.

Bortimus
Guest
Bortimus
Offline

Sometimes being a quitter is simply not falling into the trap of the sunk cost fallacy. I’d reckon there are two types of morons in this world: people who refuse to try anything out of fear of failure, and people who try so hard at a bad idea out of fear of failure that they waste all their resources.

GRock
Guest
GRock
Offline

One of the worst mistakes you can make is when you actually have failed by exhausting all the possible avenues, and due to the blood, sweat, and tears you put into a business (for instance), you hold on to it and it becomes the biggest life-sucking liability of a parasite imaginable, thus destroying your life.

Obviously this applies especially to women in your life as well. One could argue that the great conflicts we are taught in English class readings are all fair except one: Man vs Man (fair), Man vs Nature (fair), Man vs Man (Unfair). The later would be fair if we lived in the Wild West. Eye for an eye. Problem is too many laws protect shadiness and back stabbing among humans.

You could take that a step further and say that Man vs Man is really just a more specific form of Man vs Nature, it’s a jungle out there and we’re all part of it. The wisest thing I’ve learned is be very, very critical of who the people you allow to affect your life are. Once the evil doers, and ignorant fools are removed, there is no single accomplishment, time permitting, a man cannot achieve. What one man can do another man can do.

g status
Guest
g status
Offline

Well said. I’ve been telling this to people but now I can just send them this article. Which may have more credibility than my voice.

Scott Worthington
Guest
Scott Worthington
Offline

Well, after I graduated from law school (at the bottom of my class, but ı stıll graduated!) I dıd everythıng I could to pass a state bar exam. It ıs a yearlong physıcally brutal, fınancıally draınıng, psychologıcally devastatıng exam- for those of us who arent that brıght but stıll want to work hard. I could’nt do ıt. I took NY 3xs, and DC once. In the meantıme I was goıng deeper and deeper ınto debt and defaultıng on my student loans. Eventually you have to cash ın your chıps and fıgure out a new game (escape) plan. But I really feel lıke I gave ıt my all, I mean, I was facıng homelessness bro! Now I am teachıng Busıness Englısh to executıves and Legal Englısh to lawyers ın Turkey. Sometımes I genuınely feel lıke a faıled lawyer from the US who had to go to greener pastures cuz he couldnt make ın Amerıca. But most days I am grateful I have a job, makıng money, learnıng a forıegn language, and bangıng chıcks. Thats all I ever wanted.

Nguyen Improved
Guest

Trawled your recent writing to find this nugget. Great Stuff Roosh.

Kizman
Guest
Kizman
Offline

Great article Roosh. Really helped me put things in perspective.