Nerds Will Rule The World

In the past, hustle, effort, and practicality were rewarded far more than analytical intellect. The fortunes of Sam Zemurray, John D. Rockefellar, Cornelius Vanderbilt, and Andrew Carnegie were built on guts as much as brains. Back then an ambitious man could identify a scarcity or inefficiency in plain day and create an empire. If you read the biographies of men born before the 20th century, you rarely see how an studious engineer or solitary nerd made it into the millionaire club. This is now changing. Computer nerds will soon be the most powerful class in the world, surpassing those who rule the finance and oil sectors. Their time has come.

The story of Sam Zemurray, titan of United Fruit, is an illustrative example. An uneducated immigrant, he got his start by noticing unwanted bananas on the New Orleans shipping docks. He bought them at a discount and began hustling them to nearby cities via train. A few decades later he was the most powerful banana man in the world. If he was born today, would he be able to duplicate his success? I think not. Businesses based on shipping and physical commodities have been optimized and consolidated. A young man walking through the docks today is more likely to be threatened with arrest by aggressive security guards than to get his inspiration for a successful business.

In daily walks through your city, are inefficiencies in commerce obvious to you? Are their consumers wanting a product but unable to buy? This is sometimes the case in developing countries where there is ample room to start a restaurant or import/export business, but even then you’d have to search hard to find any gaps. In America, nothing short of massive investment is needed to start such a traditional business. Even opening a basic coffee shop in America will cost over $50,000, and for your troubles you get to face severe competition from giant multinational corporations.

The story of Sam Zemurray can be duplicated today, not be a street-wise hustler but by the nerdy kid with an idea and a computer. There are still many professional jobs like lawyer, doctor, and accountant that pay fine salaries, but the new empires of tomorrow will be based on computing and programming—devices, applications, online stores, social networks, and data gathering and analysis. This is the black gold of the 21st century.

If I had a son today, he would receive his first computer programming book one year after learning how to read. I would turn him into a competent coder who can then choose whatever life he sees fit—making a stable income maintaining the world’s computer systems, robots, and web sites, or striking out on his own with independent ventures. The devices you use every day that you take for granted needs men who can code to develop and maintain them, and I think it’s obvious to all of us that technology will be more a part of our daily lives than less. The technological rubicon has been crossed.

I wouldn’t tell my son to follow in my footsteps. Historically, creative work has been an under-appreciated field that is hard to live off of, and many of the dead famous authors you read died in poverty. The main reason I’ve done well is because I’ve taken advantage of the platforms that the nerds created. I embraced blogs as soon as they became popular, I had my books on Kindle before I even held the device, I learned basic web coding and design to present my work in an appealing manner, and I have been active on the social networks that people now use as their main way to receive information. If I was a fogey old book writer who refused to adopt technology, would I be in the lucky position I find myself in, making book money while I live in foreign countries, chasing exotic women?

The kings of tomorrow are computer programmers. The richest men in the world will be a skinnyfat geek who has uglier girlfriends than you and even more awkward social skills. Only now are those nerds starting to use their massive wealth to influence politics, and once they do, their vision of technological utopia will shower upon us all.

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Jack
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The problem is that the “Coding world” is utterly saturated. Try to get a job as a programmer….good luck. They are a dime a dozen. In fact you can actually go online…(I can’t remember the website) and outsource your coding. Say you want to build a website that does this and that. You just order it and they will deliver it to you.

Invictus III
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Invictus III
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This is true but the real winners are the coders with their own ideas who build something of their own. You don’t need to compete with the billions of other coders for jobs when you code for yourself.

Purple Penguin
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Purple Penguin
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Exactly, and you don’t even have to be that good a coder, it is far easier to code what you want when you imaginated it yourself.

Caveman
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It’s saturated only if all you can do is simple programs and plain websites, because this is what the other 99% of coders can do as well. However if you’re specialized in some niche, then you can make a much higher than average living in any country anywhere in the world.
You can also make a lot if you’re not very specialized, like sort of a generic programmer, but you’re able to tackle very complex projects, like the ones others have no idea where to begin. But to be able to do that you still need a lot of experience, having encountered and solved all sorts of problems before, and invested into a lot of additional professional education while acquiring your experience.

TheOverwatch
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TheOverwatch
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I agree. Most people will do the bare minimum naturally, so you can expect most competition to stick to the easy stuff that makes them competent i.e HTML, CSS, JS. If you get into the really hard stuff like back end, server side stuff and databases, you will have work. Also most people don’t have the patience to learn really complex computer programming topics like algorithms. There is plenty of work everywhere I look, you just need specialized skills. Also a lot of jobs exaggerate their requirements. They list a need for 5+ years experience to throw together a basic website.

'Reality' Doug
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'Reality' Doug
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Appreciating the insights to the CS field. Thanks, guys.

TymerTopCat
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Jack, please. You have no idea what you are saying. The Coding world you describe is those of “Script Kiddies”, “Web Pages”, “Cell phone apps”, this stuff is not good software, and is being written by Code Monkeys that are not software/hardware engineers. They are kids throwing mud at a wall to see what sticks.
The Real Software and Hardware world is owned by the Developers / Programmers and Project managers who know what they are doing.
The biggest Software/Hardware business is in Microcontrollers, PLC’s, via Automation. If you have the guts and smarts to work in this industry, you will have serious income and serious power.
-R

Sd
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Roosh,

You forgot one key enemy the H1B from India cheap labor. Making good coin today in STEM is not secure due to Indians who work 7 days a week for less than minimum wage.

splooge
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splooge
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whts h1b?
ya thriugh tech u can easily be outsourced by numurous south asians.

SJ
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SJ
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H1B is a visa immigration program that has allowed the US corporations to flood the US labor market with cheap labor from India.

mv
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mv
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H1B is a non-immigrant visa. They are never meant to stay permanently, only for three years, renewable to six. Just enough time to work cheap, get experience then go back and fold that experience into wherever they came from. The big software companies love it as there is a never ending supply of fresh, cheap labor to do the grunt work, and the pool recycles itself – no long term legacy costs as there are with permanent employees.

Der Mac
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And the entirety of the planet has to try to tolerate or work around the sh!tty applications that result from their sloppy output.

anonymous
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anonymous
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Or: the low hanging fruit is gone. The world is a far more efficient place than it used to be.

Overall, this is a positive development. If you want to be rewarded, you need to bring true skills and true value to the table. “Hustling”, whatever the fuck that even means, will no longer cut the mustard. Meritocracy will be king.

Most RVFers won’t be thrilled with this development grin

americanbk
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Hustling is not dead if you’re a female. This is maybe the best time in history to be a female entrepreneur – the whole world is rooting for you. Female business owners get tax breaks, positive press, and intense support from consumers. If you have a girl with feminine charm who knows how to take advantage of it, it’s like bringing a gun to a knife fight. It’s been well documented – the corporate world has no choice but to be terrified of women.

I have a female business partner. When it’s time to negotiate with powerful people, I just get out of the way. She crushes it in situations where I would probably be laughed out of the room. Call me beta if you want – she’s gonna make me a rich one.

ActionJackson
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I also noticed that GM conveniently appointed a woman CEO earlier this year right before the shit hit the fan with their Cobalt coverup …

Fuck that!
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Fuck that!
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Quote: “probably be laughed out of the room. Call me beta if you want – she’s gonna make me a rich one.”

I hear ya. In business I usually think in terms that if the ends justifies the means. And indeed the west, in particular the USA is very gynocentric and men are almost ignored.

If you have a loyal skag in your corner, the better. I have a family relative in my corner and she’s a bit of a mover and shaker in the business world. She’s helping me out with my business and things are running much more fluidly than if I were to do the same thing.

'Reality' Doug
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Winner-take-all is not a meritocracy. Look at the effect of woman’s lib on the quality and price of pussy. Even ‘free’ pussy is often too much work for those hours our indulging her narcissistic hamster.

What happens if only 10% of people are rewarded and keep contributing, producing? The ninety percent go on welfare, crime, burn their savings,…but it never stops: it compounds. Ten percent of ten percent of ten percent… It is NOT meritocracy if you are graded on the curve. It is debt slavery, and people have been brainwashed to think a positive contribution should not be rewarded because it is not the top shelf of the skewed job market. Labor should be able to express itself, period. There is not labor shortage, only regulation and job shortage, on purpose. Certain geeks already run the world. Maybe nonelite geeks will democratize their power, but I don’t count on it.

“The world is a far more efficient place…” lol Slavery is really efficient, thank gawd. Just so efficient. Every government our proxy for debt slavery, just so efficient with deficits to the horizon.

sam
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sam
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Yes, the increasingly winner-take-all dynamic is the relevant observation. Saying “geeks will rule” is missing the point. There are 40,000 guys as smart as Mark Zuckerberg who tried and failed in comparable ventures in the same time frame and wound up in some mere $100K office job. It’s like acting in Hollywood, but ultimately not as bad as waiting tables.

“Geeks” won’t “rule”. Maybe 500 geeks for whom the stars aligned will have a ton more influence than they do now. But I don’t see them shoving aside the CEOs of Exxon and Morgan Stanley.

Anyway, this idea that technologists are all hopeless, pasty manginas is really off base. Larry Ellison, Scott McNeally, Bill Joy, and Mark Cuban are nerds? No, those guys were all alpha in many dimensions of their lives, not just technical skills. If I recall correctly John Romero knocked up four different chicks, two before he even got rich, though in his case he is a nerd.

Centipede
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Getting into software development is a great way to combine location independent lifestyle with good salary.

keith
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keith
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I have to completely disagree with this on both main points, but on the first point you may agree with my disagreement.

The first point made is that many non-tech businesses, especially commodity based businesses are impossible to start, or there are few gaps in the market for one to start. I think there are huge gaps. But the point that it cost so much to start a coffee shop is right on. But why? Because of massive government. Rules and regulations make it very hard for new businesses. I’d love to buy raw milk, or non-pasteurized cheeses and ice cream so that I don’t poo my pants after eating dairy. Some people deal with the threats and harassment from the government in order to sell these things, but it’s a huge headache. The market is there, but the government stifles it. There is even a market for steel production in the U.S., but the taxes and regulations make it uncompetitive. Look at all the businesses that started in garages or homes, google, famous amos, HP, Yankee Candle, etc. Now if someone tries to bake out of their home and sell the products they are fined, threatened, shut down, and possibly arrested. I’d love to buy locally baked goods, but the government tells me I’m not allowed to.

There are huge gaps in the market. The key is getting around the government. You can hope the thugs don’t show up to harass you, you can BS them as much as possible, or move to a state or county that will protect you. There are strategies but you have to think things out well ahead of time. Just don’t start a business in California or New York. You might as well shoot yourself.

The other point that coding is somehow a path to richness is very far off. You can hire coders online for a nickel an hour. You can hire foreigners with an H1B visa for dirt cheap as well. Ask anyone that has interviewed at IBM, or HP or any other large tech company. Most of the workers now are on an H1B visa, while many U.S. citizens with tech degrees have to leave the country or face unemployment. A local company a family member of mine works for needed a whole database and online relay system made. They were thinking they would pay a fortune for coders here to do it. Instead they found out they could hire Indians and had the whole thing done for $400. This is a company with over 5000 employees. Now they pay indians to maintain the system as well.

Part of the problem with this thinking is that people see online companies going public and the founders cashing out with huge valuations. There are two problems with this. One is you don’t see all the people that don’t get venture capital to finance them to give away a product for free (because that’s what they’re doing). So you don’t see the unseen. The other thing is these companies are going to go broke and investors will lose a fortune. This stuff is the .com bubble all over again. Twitter lost half a billion dollars last year, they’ve never earned a profit, yet the founder is a billionaire! Look at all these internet company IPOs, most have never earned a profit and never will. So this whole hysteria won’t last. Once this bubble pops people will come to their senses….for about 6 or 7 years, then promptly do dumb crap again.

So why bother with coding when you will compete with the entire world. Learn to weld, or learn HVAC, or the local business environment (move to a good one). If you weld, you compete with local welders, not the entire world.

Dub field
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HVAC is good- I know Gus almost as redneck as Larry the Cable Guy making 200k/year doing that- that thar ain’t too bad huh?

I agree coding can be outsourced to India Tim Ferris style. My vote would go to software development (its like writing a book- do the work once get paid forever-if its good),

Keith
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I don’t know how I posted my comment twice. But software is a pain too because a small guy can get sued for so many patent infringements. There are patents on all kinds of code that no one can keep track of. So software development ends up just being legal warfare.

Caveman
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Theoretically yes, but in practice it very rarely happens. And this applies only to the small percentage that write software to be massively distributed. For the most part they don’t have to worry about it until they become a big business.

And if you do custom code for other clients and they don’t distribute their software (as it is the case for 90% of the coders), then patents don’t affect you at all.

Caveman
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Your part about the government deliberately stifling small businesses with regulations so they can help big business is very correct.

However the other is not. Quality coding still is a highly paid job, even in western countries. Just don’t pay attention to the 90% commodity programmers. They’re not a real competition. Most of them never had a talent for programming anyways. Usually in high school they played games, surfed the net and chatted in mIRC, and then come time for college they chose a computer science major thinking computer science is something similar to surfing the net and installing a mIRC on your friend’s computer. They don’t have a programming core in their soul and will never be able to compete with the real geeks.

keith
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Sure but you’re not addressing the coders overseas. They are the competition, not the gamers with a coding hobby.

Caveman
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The coders overseas are a dime a dozen because their work is worth a dime a dozen. If you do quality work then they’re not your competition.

And the gamers who started coding as a hobby are much more programmers in their soul and their potential is much higher than those who encountered programming for the first time in college.

Jonathan Neufeld
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I’ll say this much, in high-school I was coding-up 2D video games just to keep-up with my peers. And then they would make fun of me for an executable that was larger than 100k.

My how things have changed, today you’re a god if you can put hello world on a web page. It’s sad.

Blaximus
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Blaximus
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Spot on post. A handfull of billionaires and successful companies don’t account for massive, high paying job opportunties in these fields. That metric has been dis mantled years ago.

xiagox@gmail.com
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I’m currently working on a mobile app that I think will appeal to the pua / teenage texting market. If you’re interested in joining the beta plz email me directly at xiagox cheez gmail.com replace cheez with at. Its called txtbinge.

RussianArtist
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RussianArtist
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>. If you’re interested in joining the beta
This made my day. The context is just too damn hilarious.

Keith
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Keith
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I have to completely disagree with this on both main points, but on the first point you may agree with my disagreement.

The first point made is that many non-tech businesses, especially commodity based businesses are impossible to start, or there are few gaps in the market for one to start. I think there are huge gaps. But the point that it cost so much to start a coffee shop is right on. But why? Because of massive government. Rules and regulations make it very hard for new businesses. I’d love to buy raw milk, or non-pasteurized cheeses and ice cream so that I don’t poo my pants after eating dairy. Some people deal with the threats and harassment from the government in order to sell these things, but it’s a huge headache. The market is there, but the government stifles it. There is even a market for steel production in the U.S., but the taxes and regulations make it uncompetitive. Look at all the businesses that started in garages or homes, google, famous amos, HP, Yankee Candle, etc. Now if someone tries to bake out of their home and sell the products they are fined, threatened, shut down, and possibly arrested. I’d love to buy locally baked goods, but the government tells me I’m not allowed to.

There are huge gaps in the market. The key is getting around the government. You can hope the thugs don’t show up to harass you, you can BS them as much as possible, or move to a state or county that will protect you. There are strategies but you have to think things out well ahead of time. Just don’t start a business in California or New York. You might as well shoot yourself.

The other point that coding is somehow a path to richness is very far off. You can hire coders online for a nickel an hour. You can hire foreigners with an H1B visa for dirt cheap as well. Ask anyone that has interviewed at IBM, or HP or any other large tech company. Most of the workers now are on an H1B visa, while many U.S. citizens with tech degrees have to leave the country or face unemployment. A local company a family member of mine works for needed a whole database and online relay system made. They were thinking they would pay a fortune for coders here to do it. Instead they found out they could hire Indians and had the whole thing done for $400. This is a company with over 5000 employees. Now they pay indians to maintain the system as well.

Part of the problem with this thinking is that people see online companies going public and the founders cashing out with huge valuations. There are two problems with this. One is you don’t see all the people that don’t get venture capital to finance them to give away a product for free (because that’s what they’re doing). So you don’t see the unseen. The other thing is these companies are going to go broke and investors will lose a fortune. This stuff is the .com bubble all over again. Twitter lost half a billion dollars last year, they’ve never earned a profit, yet the founder is a billionaire! Look at all these internet company IPOs, most have never earned a profit and never will. So this whole hysteria won’t last. Once this bubble pops people will come to their senses….for about 6 or 7 years, then promptly do dumb crap again.

So why bother with coding when you will compete with the entire world. Learn to weld, or learn HVAC, or the local business environment (move to a good one). If you weld, you compete with local welders, not the entire world.

Edward
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Where can I get coding for a nickel an hour? Surely that’s a hyperbole … otherwise I’m wasting my time coding and just need to be the idea man.

keith
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elance.com guru.com There are many more. Stop doing coding yourself. Just hire these guys online and sell the finished product to whoever you’re coding for now. You’ll be the middle man raking in tons of money. That is until people wise up and cut out the middle man.

sam
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sam
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A low rate for a competent software engineer on short term contract is $90 an hour. More complex or specialized efforts command $250 an hour. If you are paying less you are dealing with an incompetent code monkey who will make you stuff that doesn’t actually work.

Overseas outsourcing as an arbitrage opportunity is pretty much over. Anyone in India and so forth who is any good is charging almost what Americans charge. This is why there’s now so much noise about increasing visas from big businesses; they want to import more cheaper indentured labor because it’s not actually any cheaper to send work overseas anymore.

Tom Dane
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I work in this business. 4 out of 5 projects FAIL or dont work well. So just paying someone to “make this or that” will not guarantee that you will get the right product.

keith
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I’ve hired these guys before and businesses I work with hire them as well. What you do is hire 5 or so to do the same thing then pay all those that work up to par. Some may not do the job right so you’re correct on that. But paying 5 guys 1/100th of what it cost to hire one person in the U.S. is still a great deal.

Joe
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Joe
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Agree with keith.

1) Start-ups are definitely “hot” right now, but how many of them are actually going to add anything of real value? Does advertising with Facebook really help businesses increase revenue?

2) I do agree with Roosh that highly talented computer nerds can write their own ticket, but it’s my understanding that most of the jobs in the tech industry are not for these “elite” nerds. I was very confused about the whole H1B program before I read this article. (http://heather.cs.ucdavis.edu/h1b10min.html) Now it makes a whole lot more sense. Seems to me that unless you are young, really interested in computers and think you might have a talent for it, and think you can get into a fairly decent CS program, know that you will be competing with lots of people around the world willing to work for much, much less than an American, and that many tech companies are pushing for expanding the H1B program. Someone correct me if I’m mistaken but it seems many of these H1B holders come to America to learn how to do certain jobs so that they can eventually go back home and do the same job in a country that has much lower labor costs.

3) Given the fact that off-shoring and automation are going to keep increasing, it seems wise for most people to choose careers that are resistant to these trends. Keith mentioned a few good ones. Moving away from the madding crowd to more business-friendly states and cities is another good option. I’ve heard Oregon, the Gulf Coast, and Raleigh-Durham mentioned as decent, cheaper places to live and potentially raise a family if that’s your thing…

pod
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pod
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Yes. You are. I coded for about ten years. Your loyalty is never rewarded. You are never respected. You are not allowed to get into other facets of the business. The business types KNOW that they need to be wary of your intelligence and they treat you like shit accordingly.

TheHammer
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This is generally true for most industries. It’s basically a barrier to entry that is put up to protect owners of businesses from internal take over/competition so they can keep profiting off the producers/people who get shit done.

Fuck that!
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Fuck that!
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Quote: “….famous amos, HP, Yankee Candle, etc. Now if someone tries to bake out of their home and sell the products they are fined, threatened, shut down, and possibly arrested. I’d love to buy locally baked goods, but the government tells me I’m not allowed to. ……There are huge gaps in the market. The key is getting around the government”

The sad thing about the this remark? This is exactly what people do in Third World countries in order to survive, and its quite telling just where the United States is heading.

Ray Wolfson
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it’s true that the government is a major obstacle…. if Apple started in a garage today, they’d have health and safety, environmental protection and a dozen other agencies breathing down their necks…. just liability insurance is very costly for a small business not to mention minimum wage and the burden of complex tax returns etc.

Eli
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Eli
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I’m not sure I agree. Computer programmers who take an entrepreneurial path can make a lot of money if their idea is successful. This is true of any venture. However, analysts at hedge funds or private equity funds still make much much more than programmers at Google, Microsoft, Apple, FB, etc. etc…often many multiples more…it’s true these are also sometimes geeks, but i don’t believe it’s just programmers who benefit. This is very cyclical – 6 to 8 years ago tech valuations were very different and it was hard to raise capital and VC Funds did very poorly…the reflation by the U.S. central bank has driven nose bleed valuations in silicon valley with no real basis supporting them. This could change in a hurry…programming will likely always be a good place to earn income but to think that the tech gold rush that exists today will go on forever is foolish. Furthermore, remember, it was the Fed that popped the last tech bubble in ’99 by starting to take up rates…the same is likely to happen this time around…The Whatsapp $19bn deal likely marked the top of this insanity.

RussianArtist
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$19B might be a bit high, but it does have millions upon millions of real users.

eli
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eli
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“$19Bn might be a bit high”. Are you out of your mind? the company generated less than $20 million of annual revenue…You can buy real companies that generate $1 or $2Bn in consistent annual cash flow for that price…It’s beyond lunacy. Those millions upon million of real users don’t pay for it, that’s why they are there..there are zero barriers to entry for that biz…

RussianArtist
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RussianArtist
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The wording about revenue vs cash flow is very confusing and ambiguous.

Betatopua
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The purchase wasn’t about the revenue that the company currently generates. Its a strategic acquisition. Facebook wants to control a platform that many people are predicting will soon overtake text as the modern world’s primary digital p2p communications medium. A big part of it is making sure their competitors don’t own it.

Eli
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That may be true but that says absolutely nothing about it’s price of $19Bn. It could have been a strategic acquisition at $500 million also. This company was only started in 2009 and was basically a copy of BBM, which wasn’t available cross platform. We don’t know if it has staying power, if it will become as important as you say, etc…there are many comps in the space and these technologies change rather quickly. How defensible is Facebook is they have to pay outrageous sums to buy companies that might threaten them?

keith
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Yeah I can start a free brothel and I’ll have millions of users too. It’s easy to get users when what you’re giving away is free.

RussianArtist
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RussianArtist
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Google’s free to use too. Using it to advertise your shit however is not.

Robert
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Robert
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Valizadeh and friends-
Couple of thoughts- if the totalitarian team murica’ international invaders for the Rothschild banking cartel in add Iran or Russia they could throw down a pulse bomb that will make it the stone age-and girls won’t be making selfish and checking for likes but letting you put it any where you want for as long as you want for a months supply of food (look at what German women did during WW2-hooking for cigarettes and chocolate).

Roosh is more if a risk taker, creative, and probably intelligent than most so his success comes really from hard work, very clever business acumen, and creative innotivity above most and I bet 10knif I lived in that sewer of malevolency called DC I’d be as motivated as anyone to get out of the Brooks Brothers wearing GS scale dull prick galaxy of culture they are know for.

I think he whole get rich technology comes from people who are either super creative or who just add pesto to plain grain, call it artisan, and sell it for a profit mentality. You guys are right brick and mortar bizs are a headache now because they must be 1984 approved by the man at every turn- its total crap. The guys who founded Home Depot said there was no way they could do it in AmeriKa today with all the asinine bureaucracy.

BigBoobyLovah
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BigBoobyLovah
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My prediction: Nerds will not rule the world. Because women will not be boinking to get pregnant to give birth to future nerds:

http://nypost.com/2014/04/10/more-young-women-choosing-dogs-over-motherhood/

Single American women don’t need men for marriage and babies either – just little dogs.

splooge
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splooge
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dunno bout that they can pay the right price to get it or get a girl from east asia or esstern europe(hopefully smart enuff to weed out gold diggers.

TheHammer
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TheHammer
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Girls from Eastern Europe and Asia are all gold diggers. This is what makes me laugh about all these guys who crap on about finding a wife overseas. Although having said that, their main point revolves around getting more bang for your buck with less bad attitude so that’s all fair enough.

Jonathan Neufeld
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Well that’s the beauty of the Internet, created by nerds, it has allowed things like feminism and post-modern nihilism to spread throughout the planet at breakneck speed.

Bosch V
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Bosch V
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From my personal experience I would like to add that if you are a Student or searching for quick and easy way to earn money learn Excel + VBA. I’m dead serious. I studied CS and I tried to get some jobs but they always wanted somebody with experience and shit. Somebody gave me the tip to learn VBA and try it that way and BOOM! Pretty much all big companies are using Excel but the people that are working with this shit mostly only know the basics. Whenever some new script is needed they hire usually external workers and since they think that this is something very easy, you will find a job just by stating that you have knowledge. VBA helped me when I got some really tight problems with money. I love MS for that. After I graduated I had already working experiences with many different companies and was able to build some connections, it made the search for a “real” programming job that much easier.

Kenchi Olsen
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VBA and Excel will eventually replaced with Python, R, or Julia, at least in the financial industry. EVENTUALLY. If you are a developer and don’t want to be a code monkey you need to learn a industry. Finance, Real Estate, etc. If you are a good coder, and you can quickly automate insufficiency you are worth your weight in gold.

AFemaleCat
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No way in hell.

The only exception to the rule is if the computer nerd is someone with worldly knowledge. BUT I’ve never seen the two combined. You can’t sit at a computer coding while at the same time understand what’s going outside your door.

At my old company there was a group of men working on some fantastic crazy amazing shit…but they had families and children and couldn’t risk losing their jobs so all of their intellectual work was property of the company. None made over 120K a year which is less than airplane pilot for a shitload more work (but they have no leverage over life and death, crashing and killing people).

So?

The way I see it white computer nerds (in my book those are the only ones who matter) are going to the way of the dodo bird because so many of them marry outside their race. Despite the common-as-a-cockroach attitude, I’m not convinced that combining races leads to uber-children….I see only a destruction of the standard deviation that leads to exceptional ism.

Computer science is like every other career since the dawn of time. If you are exceptional…you will have power and money and all those things. But only like 1% of the people are truly exceptional in any field.

It doesn’t matter what field you choose as long as you are part of that 1%. So may as well go where your genes take you and make the most of it.

Людмил Иванов
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What you said is indicative of how society works – men do what they have to, women do what they want to. CS is not glamorous so – no pussy for you mister!

Samseau
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You forget that many of these nerds marry Asian when they marry outside of their race, so there’s no reason to believe that their children will not be at least as smart as they were.

AFemaleCat
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That was exactly what I was referring to. I think white men by marrying Asian are destroying the standard deviation of their bell curve. But if they aren’t smart enough to at least THINK of that possibility before marriage then they probably weren’t exceptional to begin with.

Half-Asian Half-White = Uighur and that’s pretty much all I need to know

JB
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JB
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According the controversial 1994 book The Bell Curve: Intelligence and Class Structure in American Life by Charles Murray and R.J. Herrnstein…Asians as a group have a slightly higher IQ than whites.

Fathercoughlin
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I thought you meant they were marrying black women and I was like “whaaa??”

Samseau
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Those are descendants of Mongols. They look white because Mongols captured Russians and Chinese and fucked all the women and blended them together. Not exactly the cream of the genetic crop.

Theodore Logan
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Hustling is what con-artists/salesmen, prostitutes, and politicians do. Those jobs will always exist.

RussianArtist
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Roosh, after “Sheep in The Real Game of Power” this post is Blue Pill Extraordinaire.

I’m far from the States, but I’ve been following it’s startup/programming scenes for years. There is no paradise. Even Google has it’s fair share of god awful managers who can fuck up your shit royally.

Some quick taste of Red Pill for programming can be had here:

http://zedshaw.com/essays/dont_move_to_nyc_to_do_your_startup.html

1)The gist is: Whatever funding startups can get is chump change to the old boys in NYC.


Or, how about this: A while back, Bloomberg (another guy who made a lot
of BILLIONS off banks in NYC) got together with some funds and put up
2 million (yes “MI-LLION”) to get NYC’s startups going. They were going
to give out 200k each through an entity called NYC Seed. Yes, they were
going to kick start NYC’s startup scene with 10 companies and hand them barely
enough money to pay rent for 3 months at NYC prices.

That same day, the CEO of BofA announced that he wanted to give back the
20 BILLION dollars
he took in bailout money because he didn’t really need it.

Imagine that this 20 BILLION went to funding startups in NYC. That’s 100
thousand startups
at the 200k financing rate.

The CEO of BofA basically was given the option of taking or leaving a
sum of money that equaled
100000 startups. If each of those startups hired 5 people you’d have a
startup culture the size
of some large American cities. Yet, this dude was able to take it in a
short amount of time and
give it back the same way I might borrow five bucks from a friend.

Remember when the dot-com crash happened in 2001? Was there a bailout?
Nah,
no bailout for those damn nerds and hippies, even though the banks
caused the crash by pulling pump-and-dump schemes with shit technology
companies nobody should have invested in. Nope, your technology isn’t
worth
a bailout.

and here:

http://michaelochurch.wordpress.com/2014/04/11/meritocracy-is-the-software-engineers-prince-charming-and-why-thats-harmful/

2)This guy has a whole plethora of posts on red pilling the programmers. And yeah, he’s programmed at Google.

Some of his main points are:

Connections are everything, meritocracy is nothing.

VCs in Silicon Valley? Most of them are dumb offsprings of NYC’s rich. And being sent there from elite MBAs and shit to work as a $300K VP of something in a startup is “considered’ so fucking shameful and such an utter failure that none of them would show up at any kind of reunion.

Who leads doctors at a hospital? A doctor. Who leads police? A policeman. (Can you see where he’s going with it?)

Who usually leads programmers? Fucking clueless managers who have no unique technical expertise. They are dime a dozen. Why? Because programmers are a colonized tribe. This is not even beta. This is omega territory.

Truth about programming needs to be spread just as manosphere spreads the truth about women.

Blaximus
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A word of caution, from an old(er) man.
I have been on both sides of this equation. I have been in businesses that required more hands on, labor intensive effort as well as an ability to ” think ” your way around problems. I’ve also spent the past 25 years in the tech arena.
Tech changes constantly compared to other modes of business/money making. But what I’ve noticed over the past 2.5 decades, is the massive shift to tech-based jobs/economies.
That is not a good look long term gentlemen.
When I first got into my present field, there was a flood of people wanting to get into ” tech ” computer related jobs. In short order the huge supply of folks with tech related skills immediately started driving down salaries. I’ve consistantly improved my skills and connections so as not become a casualty. I don’t think those trying to start out in these fields will be so lucky longer term.
Another aspect is the future. If everyone flocks toward making money by basically thinking and typing, we will reach a tipping point where labor, the guy who knows how to physically frame a house, will start to become ever scarce and the earnings will tip in the other direction.
Tech is a blessing, and a curse. It lulls people to sleep in a sense. A man who can actually ” do ” things will always be better off. He won’t starve when tech shuts down supermarket deliveries. During hurricane Sandy, I got a first hand look at how batshit crazy people were going after 5 days without electricity. All the tech know-how in the world didn’t help them ( at the basic level that most tech savy people aquire…).
Nerds rule indeed…. for now. Things change. They always do. Tech changes as the speed of light compared to other industries. Eventually it will bec ome crazy and redundant. How many social networking sites are enough?How many smartphone apps are too many? There is a finite answer. There always is.
Suggestion? be tech savy, yes. Definitely. But learn how to grow food, catch fish, butcher meat, fix your car, build shelter….. do some basic, manual things. Because when you depend on ” tech ” for sustenance… tech can kill.

anon
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anon
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I think you are right. There is still some serious money to made for men who get it done and know their shit (plumbing, electrician, etc.) what would be considered blue collar but these guys make nearly 3 figures an hour sometimes. Typing away on a blog all day may make you some money but it doesn’t “get it done” so to speak.

TheHammer
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With service (unless you have assets/people working for you) you cannot earn more than the time you put in, which is limited. With a digital product, your earning potential is not based on time but quantity of product sold.

It’s apples and oranges and the two methods aren’t really comparable however both rely on the reputation of your output.

This is kind off topic anyway…

Fuck that!
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Quote: “A word of caution, from an old(er) man”

Good points made, Pops.

I agree and as you mentioned the hurricane disaster, I would like to add in too that an EMP (ekectro magnetic pulse) could also seriously fuck up the tech world as well for perhaps a longer period if time.

Ihco
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I agree with you.
I am young comparing to you, actually have a age you spend only in tech area.
I start my first company in Algeria, and really there is a lot of money to make in tech area, I choose it cause it easy to start (computer and your brain at first) but, I expend my business to other area.
the point in this article I think is that it’s more easy actually to start in “computer” business then in other because it’s new and require less investment to start, the government didn’t make a lot of restrictions yet it like banana man before a 20 century.
Any way it was a pleasure to read your comment. We fill wisdom and integrity in your words.

yohami
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You dont need to know how to code to make products. Most of my clients, making the real money know nothing about programming. Capital creates capital.

Seeing the inefficiencies in the market and being able to create a business is its own talent. If you’re into getting rich, get that talent.

Jeremy
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Computer engineers have no vision save the problems they’re currently trying to solve. You can steer society by controlling the problems put in front of software engineers, because they’re just going to solve whatever you pay them to solve. This is why Microsoft Windows has always sucked, because management told the engineers to solve management-defined problems, no the actual problem as defined by what’s happening on “the ground”.

Nerds will not rule the world, they’re wage-slaves just like anyone else.

The management-class, the people who define the problems people will get paid to solve, are already ruling the world.

If nerds actually ruled, Obamacare websites wouldn’t suck elephant dick.

keith
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To be fair anything the government can’t do anything right.

Fathercoughlin
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Didnt Obama give the job to a gook company because he,uhm has “issues” with us white guys?

Sid
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I don’t think that computer programmers will become an elite class. If anything, their standards of living will continue to decline if it hasn’t already bottomed out, as companies have made it common practice to hire foreign programmers.

What advantage computer programmers do have is that, when they spot entrepreneurial opportunities in software, they can quickly capitalize on those opportunities before others can, as they possess the skills already needed to seize on those opportunities.

Those lucky entrepreneur-programmers can make billions. Unfortunately, they are so few in numbers that they’re not really a class so much as a club. The members of that club, whether they’re in charge of Facebook, Google, Microsoft or Apple, will then lobby Congress to get in as many cheap foreign programmers as possible to lower labor costs. They’re not loyal to their profession.

If you want to make millions, work smart and work hard. If you want to make billions, you really have to be at the right place at the right time, with the right skills handy. In America, that means being able to quickly code a software program to satisfy a yet unmet need. In the former Soviet Union, that has meant being able to seize on commodities.

thecaptainpower
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I think tech is in a bubble again. Facebook, twitter etc are one out of a billion, not the norm….Yes i agree mom and pop business are 20x more difficult than 50 years ago

JJ Roberts
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This is how I was able to retire at the grand old age of 36

Token Black Guy
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The main claim of this article isn’t very well supported by the premises given, not to mention the fact that Keith accurately pointed out many of the flawed claims. Maybe the article should have been titled, “Nerds will probably rule __% of the world in 2020” or “Nerds may rule much of the business world.” In order to make this claim, you should very clearly define the term nerd, and clarify situations when someone doesn’t actually fall into the category of a nerd. If you define anyone who went to a good college as a nerd, then essentially you’re saying nerds have played a prominent role in the business world for the last 50 years and will continue to do so. Well obviously. Who didn’t know that? I’m simply pointing it out because I’m sure there are plenty of other people who are sort of annoyed by the vagueness, lack of clarity, lack of takeaway, and lack of principled claims that flows together.

WorldTraveler
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Ain’t nothing bad in having both knowledge and physical power/sports.
Roosh, how about a combination of both powers: the power of intellect and power of muscles?:-) That’s how I see the normal path for any self respecting male individual

Zinger
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I’m a talented programmer but also a quite successful athlete. The thing is, there are many people who you can obviously label nerds or geeks just by looking at them and observing their personality. I’m not one of those people and you wouldn’t recognise me as a developer you first thought would be “athlete”, yet I am probably a better developer than most.

My point is, computers are a useful tool and by far the most powerful tool in the history of man. However you shouldn’t ever see them as more than that. They are not to be an all-consuming obsession but just a tool for getting things done. My generation (under 20) are the first to be raised with this technology and take it for granted. We also may be the first to see computers and software development with out the prejudice of it “being for nerds only”. Instead we may see them as a powerful tool for anyone to learn how to use with training.

I would highly encourage anyone here to dip their toes into software development without prejudice. You will be able to earn the same amount of money from anywhere in the world and without reporting to anyone. It may be the first time in the history of mankind that this type of incredible freedom is available for anyone to take up.

turkishcandy
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A while ago, you had written that programming had become an unfruitful job due to the competititon caused by countless Indian and Asian programmers on elance. I’m confused.

g status
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Having a cs background I can speak on this topic. I’ve been running a business for quite some time and can write software programs however I do come across a lot of developers that can’t do squat when it comes to changing things or affecting people. It’s definitely a rare case to have a programmer become ultra wealthy in this current state. The future maybe but usually the technician is not the one that gets rich. Visionaries must have the background yes but they won’t need to be the software experts to really rake in the benefits. Look at all the programmers around the world like in India but none of them have gotten as famous as the guys in America. Why? It takes more than just coding skills. It takes vision, determination, hustle, and a killer mentality. Unfortunately, they don’t train you that while you learn to write software. Roosh is right though, the biggest opportunities for fast growth are all in technology right now.

Learn the basics of coding. Then learn to be a killer. Then take over the world.

BigBoobyLovah
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An attractive, American woman, aged 23, at the start of her Window. With all of the male attention (both by alpha and beta, but mostly beta no doubt), starts to get a big head and thinks she’s a princess, and she thinks the attention and her status will last forever. Hitting The Wall will be brutal for this woman.

See:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2602965/Men-try-kiss-10-minutes-meeting-Meet-tattooed-stunner-whos-popular-date-OKCupid-having-choice-men-ruining-love-life.html

billu
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Says Bill Gates the nerd.

Hustle, effort, practicality, PERSEVERANCE and still counted. It’s just that coding is still the new thing, the sunrise industry. Let it settle down, then the bureacracy moves in, so does the competition -serious competition.

Bados
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First off, If you haven’t read any of Clayton Christensen’s books on Disruption and Blue Ocean Strategy, you should. They lay out a solid ground work of how an upstart business can destroy a Goliath business industry (or the reverse, how to defend your industry from upstarts if you are on top and leaving yourself vulnerable to disruption). Christensen himself was (and still is) a very successful businessman before going back to school to research why well-managed businesses fail, which lead to his theory of disruption, which has been repeatedly observed throughout history and has been applied successfully in recent years by businesses to great success (either by upstarts or by old industries to protect themselves from upstarts).

There’s also Blue Ocean Strategy which involves creating brand new markets (whereas Disruption is about going after existing markets and attacking established industries). He’s also written books on how to disrupt health care and education, making them both more affordable and accessible and efficient (instead of the trainwreck of bureaucracy they are today).

Finally, before you all start taking Roosh’s affirmation of the future belonging to computer nerds seriously, you should all be reading this first:

http://seanmalstrom.wordpress.com/2014/02/12/market-demand-determines-your-career-success/

Simply knowing computer code isn’t enough if there is no demand for the skills. There will ALWAYS be demand for food, infrastructure, and energy, however. And since there’s a dearth of workers in these fields currently, it’s a sure thing for raking in the money at present (and if there’s no work for it where are currently, just travel to where it is).

BigBoobyLovah
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I have a quibble with this article: Carnegie, Vanderbilt, et al. were indeed the “nerds” of their day. Coal, steel and railroad businesses were the Apple, Microsoft, Facebook companies of their time. Every capitalistic society has their “nerds,” advancing technology and improving their standard of living.

BigBoobyLovah
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Of course, regarding my last post, American women continue to be boinkable and breed new nerds.

PocketAA
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This is a good reason why game is going to become much more beneficial for the men of tomorrow. The future generation of men are going to be incompetent socially and psychologically. Most of them are just going to operate like robots. Game is about socializing. The most nerds the less civilization will socialize. The latter resulting in less competition.

A big reason why most women these days are single is because of the lack of socialization being done by the male population. Most of my friends from high school choose to stay home, smoking, playing video games and watching tv.

Rabbi Goldberg
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Human women are vastly over-rated, bro. This comes from a married man who has what you would call a perfect indian wife- very humble, submissive, simple, etc. So even though I have the wife that all of you guys are dreaming about, even still I can say that even the BEST of human women are vastly imperfect.

TECHNOLOGY WILL REPLACE WOMEN IN THE FUTURE!

Praise LUCIFER, the glorious Light of the New Age!

Monument Man
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“A big reason why most women these days are single is because of the lack of socialization being done by the male population. Most of my friends from high school choose to stay home, smoking, playing video games and watching tv.”

The reason they choose those activities is because it is more inviting than having to deal with snotty, self entitled cuntassed females walking around with their smartphones and their noses at a 45 degree angle.

...
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...
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I believe this… which is why i’ve wondered why this and the ROK website aren’t more attractive technologically.

TheHammer
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For what purpose? Being more attractive technologically wouldn’t add to the functionality of it.

software engineer geek
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software engineer geek
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thanks bro I appreciate the vote of confidence

Rabbi Goldberg
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Great post Roosh. In today’s world, a person who has “street sense” or rather “internet sense” is far more valuable than a person who has a PhD in genetics. If you figure out how to manipulate the internet, figure out how to make things go viral with relatively little effort, then you have a skill that is extremely valuable, an internet marketing skill.

I skipped college and all that fucking bullshit and I simply used my brain and figured out how to reach the largest amount of people with the smallest amount of effort.

I put in 12 hours combined building my Boycott American Women blog and then within 3 days of it starting up, got 3,000 hits a day, within 2 weeks, the blog had been talked about on a few national radio shows, etc. Over a course of 2 years, I estimate that approximately 20 to 40 million people heard about my blog (heard about it one way or another due to the massive publicity it got, no direct blog hits). 20-40 million people with only 12 hours effort of work.

Imagine if I spend that same effort and genius doing something actually profitable. I’m still slowly formulating the idea in my mind but gradually it is all coming together.

Rabbi Goldberg
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As for technological utopia. Virtual reality porn will be here within 1 to 2 years max. Many developers are already hard at work designing it on Oculus Rift and other VR devices.

Actual working sex robots will probably be here in another 20 to 40 years. So the future is not very bright for human women. The nerds will indeed take over, and will make human women obsolete.

Technology is what drives real change and progress. Not politics, culture, religions, etc. If the RoK writers would fund a virtual reality pornography programmer start-up, we’d do far more to destroy feminism than writing a few troll articles that piss off a few million women. With technology, we can literally make human women obsolete. God made a mistake when he created women. We can fix God’s mistakes through technology. And in that sense, we can become MORE INTELLIGENT and MORE POWERFUL THAN GOD!

Monument Man
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Virtual reality porn will never replace fucking an actual woman, despite how annoying they are

TheHammer
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And anyone who says otherwise hasn’t fucked an actual woman.

kai
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kai
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I’m happy to be a software developer. I actually working on a business idea online with that hopes I can earn enough money move to S.America and more of the things i want to do. I can even move and work from home, it’s a sweet deal.

RussianArtist
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RussianArtist
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People like Sam Zemurray were still around at least as of 1980s : http://www.bbc.com/news/business-26921870

Ray Wolfson
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10 years ago, even 5 years ago it was possible to find holes in the market…. i made a lot of money on enterprises akin to the banana venture…. today i cannot see too many…. you are right about the techs ruling the day… in 2005, I had an idea to use the mobile phone’s data package to enable chat and SMS internationally at a low cost….. I let the idea go because I am not a programmer….. 9 years later… Whatsapp sold for $18B.

Solo
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Solo
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You are exactly correct Roosh V. Technology and computers will control society even more in the future.

Ali87
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Ali87
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To see the world sliding into some technological utopia is a frightening thing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLqrVCi3l6E

guns
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guns
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Guys who run things are the same ones who always have. Guys with guns, who know how to use them, and organize men into effective armies. Don’t be fooled by temporary interlude of peace. Real power is where it always was.

bo jangles
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There is big money and little competition in export for machinery. There is a natural flow of machines from high labor cost countries to cheap labor..where a worthless machine can be completely rebuilt($125/hr labor vs $500/month). To give you an idea of one transaction, I bought a machine for 12k, sold it to an intermediary for 22k, he shipped it to south america for probably around 12k,and sold it for 79k(I later met the new owner). Ironically one cheap way of sending machines is on the decks of the banana boats, so it seems there is money to be had lying around on the docks. The big labor is learning how the shipping works, its a closed off, backwards little world.

Technomagi
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I wouldnt say im a geek but i went towards the path of computer programming and networking for a secure future in what technology has only begun….
I dont get why would someone skilled in computers be any more awkward then someone who welds a nurse or a busness man???
I prefer to be catigorized as a geek with millions in my pocket then a ghetto wanna be gangsta…….when money comes, then you get the power and women is what i believe a real alpha male is compared to those who focus more on women then finding loophole to get rich$$$$
I know one thing for sure….money can buy anything and thats including love….how else can you get trained by the best PUAs and learn how to attract the babes? It aint by looks and if it was money can buy that two

TheHammer
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“I dont get why would someone skilled in computers be any more awkward then someone who welds a nurse or a busness man??? ”

Using your brain for pure computer based logic all the time (such as programming) doesn’t translate well to using it for social interaction which requires a different style of processing and acting on information.

Basically you get good at what you do most often… and lack severely at what you don’t do. So in your example, a nurse is constantly dealing with people/being social and becomes great at it, (but sucks at programming).

Poor social interaction = awkward.

donalda
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donalda
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Nerds already rule the world. NEXT.

arsesame samesame
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arsesame samesame
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That already happened, the next frontier is biotechnology, in particular one that relates to human health. most people are willing to pay more for their health than some gizmo that competes for attention. the real tsunami is when actuarial escape velocity is on the horizon , ie clearing the damage of aging and thus preventing degenerative diseases 20 years ahead. first it will be available for really rich people and the people who are keen on it and take the extra effort to make the bar. the market for this is obviously huge, a lot of people rationalize wasting away at present but once they will see things work their opinion would change, and a gold rush of sorts will happen.

personally I’m predicting that when the issue is off the lab and into the market people with 11 figures net worth might appear.