Please Stop

This post is for everyone, including me. We need to stop saying “like.” Now. We’re the only English-speaking country that uses like as a filler word and it makes us sound retarded. I cringe when I meet an American, usually a West-coaster, who uses it in every sentence. I want to shake the shit out of them and say “PLEASE STOP YOU SOUND LIKE AN IDIOT!!!” It’s distracting and serves no other purpose than to dumb down your speech. I’m all for slang though, especially English slang (to make out = snog, to like = to be keen, bang = shag, she wants cock = she’s out for it, etc.).

While I’m on this topic I have two other suggestions specifically for American girls.

1. Volume control. Why do you have to talk so loud? I’ve never had to ask an American girl to repeat herself.

2. Stop talking about yourself. No one cares about your very minor personal stories. Out of all the stories you love telling only 2% are worthy. Save the rest for amusing yourself on the bus when your IPOD runs out of batteries. After your story barrage is done and you leave the room, everyone makes fun of you.

The only potential problem American guys have is they all have the same haircut, but that doesn’t bother me.

Oh dude you left your pomade in the bathroom.

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Sudamericana
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Similar to the American “like”, you may hear the word “tipo” a lot in BA, unless things have changed lately…

Anonymous
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The American “like” is almost as irritating as the Chinese “jiga jiga jiga”…I wonder if they know about Jay-Z?

roissy
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yeah, american girls really shriek. when you think you are god’s gift i suppose loud talking results naturally from that attitude.

foreign girls have a much more sensuous cadence to their talking. i only harp on this out of love for my compatriot american ladies. they should learn from their betters and make themselves more attractive to american men.

crap, this makes my 200th comment. i was hoping this day would never come.

waidh
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Well, that’s true but i have met many American men who speak very loudly too. Actually i moved to DC from Europe a few weeks ago, and I immediately noticed that the sound in general is just louder here in restaurants, bars, etc.

waidh
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i mean the noise, not the sound.

Jo
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Ooooh, this happens to me every time I leave the country. That cringe when I hear americans in the vicinity. Funnily enough you don’t notice it here so much.

irina wants to leave a comment but doesn't want to compete with roissy
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have you met italians?

maradooo
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Also the Dutch males and females are vvvvery loud!

Anonymous
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Is “jig jiga jiga” like giggity-giggity-giggity?

iX
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http://www.metafilter.com/66883/The-Voice-of-the-Underground-is-silenced

“We’d like to remind our American tourist friends that you are almost certainly talking too loud”

In other news, im loving both your mental and physical progress 🙂 keep it up!

Laura
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Alright, we’ll pipe down if you guys give us at LEAST another half hour of foreplay.

Deal?

Anonymous
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Is “jig jiga jiga” like giggity-giggity-giggity?

It is correctly pronounced “je ge” but a lot of Chinese people conversationally make it into “jei ge-ah.” It doesn’t really mean anything except “this,” so it’s a filler just like “like.”

Cob
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oooh… look.. the American steps outside for a little bit of time and realizes elsewhere is also good.

to summarize, my big complaint with the USA is they think “different = wrong” and then they proceed to chastise whoever is different.

Other countries can be raciest, unwelcoming, etc… BUT I find that they are MUCH, MUCH more likely to when encounting something different (i.e. a different word that says the same thing) so say “oh.. interesting.. tell me more” and be accepting that there are multiple ways to consider the same thing, knowing there often is more than one right answer.

Americans, typically, on the other hand are: “different than what I grew up being told?.. it’s wrong” and then proceed to tell you why you’re wrong and they’re right.

As you can see, I’m getting sick of living in the USA and most likely am moving away as soon as my career allows me to.

Cob
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btw roosh.. I’m not referring to you.. I think it’s fantastic you look beyond the tip of your nose. I’m just sharing a non-american’s experience living in the USA through my experiences from living on the west, east, and midwest of the usa. I commend you for getting out and realizing that other places are just as good, or good for different reasons. Most yankees are so subconsciously rah rah rah USA they don’t even realize it.

another thing I dislike here in the USA is nobody ever looks out for one another. much less of a caring society, in my opinion.

rcr
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Good riddance, Cob.

Joe T.
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YES!! I, too, have many pet peeves about American spoken English. Since I’ve been traveling a lot and interacting with a lot of foreigners who speak good English (as second or third languages), I’ve come to modify my own usage of English to be more understandable to an international “audience”.

I’ve tried to quit using “like” so much. More importantly, I enunciate more clearly and I’ve rid my vocabulary of all the “gonnas” and “havetas” and “haddas”. Now I always try to say “I am going to”, “you have to”, and “he had to”.

When I’m talking to foreign-born people, especially Europeans, this topic somehow always comes up and they remark how many Americans use these unseemly constructions, which really amount to a mangling of the English language. Since many foreigners learn English first at school, they are unfamiliar with these signs of linguistic laziness, and I notice most educated foreigners rarely use them.

I had a girlfriend from Greece for a while who had immersive English growing up in elementary and high school, with English and Irish teachers. Her spoken English accent turned out to be the loveliest hybrid of UK terms like “torch” for flashlight, with some Americanisms, plus a sexy accent with touches of Athens and London. I found her accent one of her sexiest features — especially the fact that she almost never used contractions of any kind… it was always “I am going to”, “he is talking to me”, “you are hungry”, “we do not have”, etc. For some reason I found that irresistible.

Jonk : The World's Best Looking Blogger
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Roosh, the virus has spread to Australia… !

Even I have difficulty not saying it.

From what I can tell, using ‘like’ came from Ireland .. and maybe that’s why it’s so popular in the US as opposed to say, England.

Re: the American girls I agree. Not much class there.

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Rigoberto (Cubano proprio)
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How is saying “like” any different than Spaniards saying “vale” as a filler word? Yes, I’ll admit it’s rather irritating to hear the average resident of the SFV or LA say “like” ad nauseum, but I ignore it as simple urban vernacular. After all, the 3 greatest languages on earth right now were not created by abiding by strict linguistic rules, but by a rather loose regard of rules; Vulgar Latin certainly was not the language of Cicero, but it still managed to form the many beautiful languages of western Europe. In short, stop being such elitist snobs.

Joe T.
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I should add that what is far more grating and disturbing than hearing “like” used as a filler, is the construction “I’m like” used to indicate “I said”. This is far more troubling than “he goes” for “he said”.

I serioulsy think the trend “I’m like” (heard more among white American girls and young women than any other demographic) portends the end of Western civilization.

Also, I believe that verbal cues like this are actually reliable markers of a person’s true intelligence (or lack thereof). That is, if you hear a chick saying “I’m like, why did you do that?” or “She was like, no way,” AVOID HER AT ALL COSTS.

Nb, I am *not* saying thid means she was poorly educated or comes from a bad background, although either or both may be true. I am saying that this construction is actually a highly reliable
sign of a low native IQ — that the person using it actually has a biologically, genetically inferior brain and you don’t want to waste your time with her., unless you just want sex, Even then, there may be a remote chance of mixing genes, and that is scary.

Lonnie Bruner
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I always noticed that many young Spanish speakers say “este” the same way we use “like”. You never noticed that?

Lonnie Bruner’s last blog post: Owning a sailboat is NOT expensive unless you want it to be..

DarthHideous
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Well, the Chinese use a filler word that sounds like the N-word. At least “like” won’t get you killed under a hail of black fists.