Stale

We are such a pussyfied culture. Here you can drink a can of beer on the street without getting arrested. You can buy a stick of sausage from someone who put their BBQ grill on wheels. Clubs serve alcohol until 5am or later. Pot is smoked openly on the beach and in clubs. Fireworks are legal, even in stadiums (just watch your head.) People can sell hats or electric fly swatters on the street without needing a permit. At night you can urinate against any free wall or fence. The subway doors close with only a beep, not a complicated directive. Sixteen year olds have a drink in the bar and it’s not a big deal. You can talk your way in without ID. You can pay your way out of getting arrested. There is no speed traps or sobriety checkpoints. If you step out of line the cops will give you a beating, not execution by taser.

Culture is the United States is stale and governed by too much authority. We are all treated like little children so we act like little children, needing constant entertainment and distractions. By the time we get into a bar we get drunk because it’s now such a big deal.

There is pleasure in a mix of chaos and freedom, where not everything is predictable and safe.

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OG Sally
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It’s true, you don’t think about how many rules/restrictions there are in the U.S. until you go somewhere that doesn’t have them. In [current Western European location], there are crosswalks without stoplights in the middle of busy streets, exotic dancers in windows facing the train tracks on the way to the airport, and a man slicing ham off a fresh pig’s leg on a spit at the market.

When I first arrived here, there was a big puddle of water on the tile floor near border control. My first thought was, “I should let them know, someone could hurt themselves”. My second thought was, “this isn’t America, who cares?”

Beach Bum
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Pot is illegal in Brazil, just like the US — I never seen people openly smoking on the streets and clubs (we must be hanging out with different crowds!). Urinating against a fence or wall, also illegal.

But true, you can pay your way out of getting arrested (which is a huge problem in Brazil).

And there ARE speed traps (there are speed cameras all over the place, except most people know where they are), and there ARE sobriety checkpoints (we call it “blitz”) — but yeah, you can still pay your way out of it…

You have to be 18 to drink, but someone younger drinking really isn’t a big deal. I was talking about this with Jo the other day, how in Brazil no one goes out to get “wasted” but we go out with our friends and we drink while socializing, but the drinking it’s not the purpose of the outing (you will never hear a Brazilian making plans that start with “let’s get drunk!”). You might get drunk, but you don’t go out on that intention. We grow up in a culture where alcohol is not a big deal, therefore, we don’t carry that into our adult life…

Beach Bum’s last blog post: Losing Hope.

Anon
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Why don’t you camp out in the favelas if you think lack of rules and lawlessness is so great?

Lack of men’s rights is the reason for pussyification in America, not lack of drinking beer in the streets.

irina
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DC is an extreme example

Sudamericana
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I do love and crave a bit of chaos… perhaps it has to do with being a Latin American living in the US and UK for the past four years (although I find things in Britain work much less orderly and efficiently than in DC). I did not realise the extent of my need for a little mess to give me a sense of freedom… until one of the details that exhilarated me the most on a trip to Italy was the simple dificulty of crossing the streets due to the lack of stoplights (as has been mentioned in a previous comment!)… a touch of disorder (I am not talking about lawlessness here) can be so relaxing…

Bobby Rio
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Watch out when you come back to the states…. i got fined for bringing a beer out of a bar.. cuz i forgot we live in a dictarship.

I’ve always told people what I love most about South America (besides the women) Is the sense of being in the Wild West..

sure bad things can happen but that is part of the thrill

Bobby Rio’s last blog post: Peacocking with your phone – ringtone.

Whatever
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Paying your way out of arrests privileges the privileged class and punishes the poor. It allows unchecked abuses to occur and injustice to flourish at all levels of society. If being able to buy off authority, openly break rules both minor and major (pot and urination) is what you think is the opposite of pussyification or beta culture then you can have it.

I know your eyes have been opened to the world and through your rose-colored glasses, the pussyified culture and ridiculous rules (written and unwritten) in America are stifling. Through your eyes, I am enjoying your travelogue and blog. But some of your examples of freedom and liberty must be either hyperbole for your blog or are simply strikingly naive. Do you really think that “If you step out of line the cops will give you a beating” in Brazil is some sort of truism that shows the proper balance of authority with freedom and self reliance? A quick internet search shows that police brutality and state brutality are common and unchecked in Brazil and are possibly the root of numerous social ills, especially when it comes to the poor.

Roosh, what you have identified is the freedom you experience being a part of the privileged. Brazil is a great country, with culture and freedoms that our uptight American culture might do well to learn from. Perhaps our nation should tolerate a few more subway accidents from quick closing doors or slips and falls from spilled water or food poisoning from unlicensed street vendors. The nanny state can drive some people crazy with its rules, creating a belief that there is an external solution to every problem.

But open corruption and so-called police beatings are not examples of freedom. That mixture of chaos and freedom you are inhaling that seems so fresh and alpha to your senses comes with a price that someone in your position is likely not going to pay. You may have to pay a token bribe or get hassled here and there. But to understand your expat home you should ask the someone who was railroaded into jail or one of those food sellers how often they get hassled for bribes from police and officials and get back to us.

Beach Bum
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“Whatever” — why don’t you go to Brazil first then re-write your comment?

Beach Bum’s last blog post: Losing Hope.

miik
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Don’t worry – when the economy crashes we’ll have alot more chaos. Some of us will dig it. Some of us will cause it

Anonymous
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You haven’t travelled enough. Freedom and Chaos is great… until someone figures out that there’s nobody to stop them from getting a bunch of guys with guns together and starting their own army. Or starting their own poppy field and hiring locals to be your security (2,000 locals). Until you’ve “openly smoked pot” with a guy who owns the 200 acres it’s being grown on, you’ll only marvel at the upside of this phenomenon. You’re also fortunate enough to be obviously white, and an American in a foreign country. Count your lucky stars you don’t have to travel with a security detail.

Whatever
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Beach Bum. Brazil is lovely. A world capital of culture in many ways and an example of modern government and planning on serious energy and environmental issues. An example we can follow for plenty of things in society, culture, government and the arts. Human rights is one of those murkier areas. If I read your comment to say that police corruption is not a problem or that police brutality is not a problem that affects Brazil’s citizens and impedes justice, I cannot agree. Comparatively it may affect few citizens or but it is a problem. I don’t count police corruption among the freedoms that should be applauded.

http://hrw.org/english/docs/2006/01/18/brazil12204.htm wrote that:
Police Violence
Brazil’s intractable problems of police violence and death squads reached a grisly zenith in the early morning hours of March 31, 2005, when armed men executed twenty-nine people—including women and children—outside Rio de Janeiro. Only one person escaped. The Baixada Fluminense area, where the killings occurred, is notorious for its high murder rate and for death squads connected to the military police. In the wake of mass demonstrations by Brazilian rights groups, and a public outcry from around the world, unprecedented cooperation between state and federal authorities led to the arrest of eleven police, who are being held in police custody pending trial.

Authorities believe that the Baixada massacre was committed in retaliation for the previous detention of nine police officers accused of killing two people and leaving their bodies behind a police station in Duque de Caxias, in the Baixada region. The police, whose actions were caught on film, decapitated one of the bodies and threw the head into the station. …

Anonymous
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I’m surprised it took you this long to write a post like this.

Jack Goes Forth
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This is Jack’s raging jealousy.

I can’t imagine you will ever be content in DC again.

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monohechomieda
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You are experiencing Brazil with American dollars that you earned in the American system. It would be a different story if you had to grow up in the system and earn Reals over the years. While Brazil is doing great now due to the commodities boom, their economic history is littered with periods of massive suffering. If you could speak the language and learn the stories behind the people you meet you would have a greater appreciation for the american system. Right now you are at the scratch and sniff level of understanding.

I say this with Rio being one of my favorite places in the world, but it’s one of my favorite places in the world to spend american dollars.

Jo
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I agree with monoechomieda (though I think you’re missing an R in that name). While I agree that the US can be a bit restrictive in some ways, and that deep down Americans must be really depressed to drink as much as we do, there are reasons laws are in place. You’re seeing the nice side of Rio, not the dirty, corrupt side.

roissy
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roosh, well said. freedom does seem to be on the retreat in the US and it’s all part and parcel of the feminization of first world cultures. women value security and stability, men value freedom and opportunity. and the voting patterns reflect that. a big problem is that a lot of men have morphed into women, so there are fewer freedoms every year.

but a balance has to be struck. too much freedom and lawlessness, like in southern italy, leads to the mafia and corrupt police. justice suffers when chaos reigns supreme. and unbridled freedom can cause a tragedy of the commons and stuff like this:

http://www.damninteresting.com/?p=937

but you’ve correctly identified that the problem today in advanced countries is not too much freedom, but too little, and i include taxation and regulation and PC thought police in this observation.

roissy’s last blog post: Take The Midnight Tran.

terps
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As luck would have it, I’m moving to Texas for a new job. I know it’s still America, but they have much less rules, regulations, and restrictions down there that it might as well be a whole different country! I’m moving to Houston in a week or so.

Oh, and I urinated on a tree right across the street from the washington monument at 230 am… nyah nyah nyah 🙂

Roosh
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When writing this i knew people would say “so roosh your idea of freedom or a good culture is peeing on the streets?” but those examples were the most obvious i could easily show. The overall vibe is if you cross the line just a little, there wont be a cop on your ass writing you a ticket.

A couple months before I left DC, i remember officers writing tickets in jaywalking stings in georgetown. That doesnt happen here, and it shouldnt.

Pot is illegal here, but there is not this huge fear of getting caught and having to deal with the legal system.

Sudamericana
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I heard stories about people almost being arrested for eating at the metro in DC… that is pretty ridiculous…

Beach Bum
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“Whatever” — read my first post before you posted — I said that corruption is a problem, is actually Brazil’s main problem, if we didn’t have corruption, the rest of the country could be fixed, but with corruption, money always ends in the wrong pockets.

My second comment was regarding the rest of your post, bashing Brazil.

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Joe T.
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The US is an overregulated society that doesn’t trust the individual to do shit. Plus our laws, federal, state and local, are always passed out of fear of lowest common denominator in society will do or think.

I travel a lot to Frankfurt, Germany. I was amazed the first time I stepped down into their excellent subway system and saw huge crowds of soccer fans heading to the stadium for a match, most of them carrying open bottles or cups of beer. It’s totally legal to carry open containers of alcohol in Germany. You don’t have a bunch of deranged fundie city councilmen wringing their hands at how immoral it would be, and that is refreshing.

And though I’m not a big customer, prostitution is also legal (and regulated) all over Germany. Forget about Holland, most big German cities also have their red-light districts, and unlike here in Vegas, German escort services are actually authorized to provide (ahem…) the full range of services.

Whenever I travel abroad, it is so refreshing. The stink of government-enforced “morality” emphatically does not hang in the air.

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T.
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Damn, I am long overdue for a vacation.

T.’s last blog post: The Cool Kids Show: Becoming A Relic.

John Smith
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Allright, so life is more free in the US compared to other countries.

But guess what? The fraction of the population that is a criminality-prone minority is HUGE compared with the other European countries that are mentioned. You want their level of freedom? Then prepared to deal with hooligan Hispanics and blacks all over the place.

And Brazil? Ha, whatever said it right. It’s great for the high status american, but watch City of God and tell me that you want to live there.

There are reasons why people want to LEAVE Brazil and all these other countries, and come to America.

John Smith’s last blog post: Will it ever end?.

Sudamericana
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By saying “Brazil and these other countries” you are making a huge generalization. But I guess it was to be expected, given the tone in other parts of your comment. Actually, I think that Brazil is one of the countries in Latin America that locals want to leave the least.

And to compare what it means to live in Brazil with what you see in City of God… that’s just too much… have you ever been there????? Even the poor people have an optimist predisposition, an amazingly cheerful spirit, and absolutely love their country, despite its many problems.

You are projecting an image of Latin immigrants to the US to the whole of the region, and that is just not the way things are. Of course there are reasons for which people leave their countries, but I think even most important are the reasons that make them miss them so much once live in American society.

Gunslingergregi
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Problem with the US is that it used to be there were all these rules in school that you had to abide by. Rules that were not life and death things. Kids looked at adults and saw free people. Kids wished for adulthood so they could be free of the rules. Except now the same stupid shit from school all the little tiny things apply to adults now with worse consequences. There is no longer an escape from frivolous bullshit.

Gunslingergregi
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Although prob much easier to get monetarily ahead if you have a dream and some balls in the states to save some of that loot.

Anonymous
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I don’t know how you can say paying your way out of an arrest is a good thing. Are you a Paris Hilton fan too?

InterestedParty
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Pussyfied culture? Yes, to a large extent.

We should look up to Brazil? Eeh, only if we’re allowed to be VERY selective in which parts we pick and choose. Brazil has a lot to learn from America too.

Joe T.
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The downside is that in general, in Latin America, the police have a tendency to be VERY lenient with petty street criminals, low-level thieves, small-time drug dealers and vandals.

I lived in Puerto Rico and I found this to be true even there, and PR is a US territory.

Part of the reason for this is tangled up with very complicated socioeconomic reasons. The authorities know exactly what they’re doing, and this is a conscious policy that is deeply rooted in the history of Latin Ameirca.

There is so much poverty in these places that these societies are only a few short steps away from social rebellion. I think the relative leniency of the police and authorities is a longstanding, historic tactic used by governments to allow some steam to bubble off the “pressure cooker” and act as a release valve to let the poor play out their frustrations, while forestalling the more organized revolt that these societies — particularly the rich — fear.

I think you’ll see the same thing even in today’s Venezuela under Chavez, where street crime is stil very high, and definitely in Brazil, where recently there was a huge revolt by gang bangers in a Sao Paulo maximum security prison. The imprisoned gang leaders were actually calling the shots in an open street rebellion against police.

Joe T.’s last blog post: Briggs & Riley Touring Bag.

Stone
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I totally dig the less rules outside the US, but there are some good sides to the restrictions there – when I lived in DC, I liked the 3am closing time, because if you were out with a girl, by 2:30 it’s either let’s go to my place, or you go to bed and get some sleep. Where I am now, no closing time, so if you take a party girl out, you can club-hop until 6am and by that time even if she’s had enough partying and wants to get down to business, I’m already falling asleep.

Generate
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It has been a long time since I visited DC, however it seems to me that that city may be particularly anal and unreasonably steadfast when enforcing minor laws. I live in Toronto (Canada), and although drinking beer on the streets and pot are illegal, the laws are not strictly enforced. Of course you don’t walk around the clubbing district on Saturday night sporting a spliff or a pint ON THE STREET, however you won’t readily get blasted if you’re toking in a club. I spent many a weekend post club-hopping- peeing in the back alley on the way home.

dtcb
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….and this is why I live in hong kong and not back in the states. i have more freedom here that I ever did in the US. Similar to a lot of the freedoms Roosh mentioned about Brazil (except the wall pissin’ part) and i’m paying less on taxes. the US is way too overregulated and government needs a massive overhaul at all levels. and there’s still too much Puritanical Christianity enmeshed into the US psyche for my tastes. Jesus freaks and Bible humpers have set the US back a good 10 years on our scientific progress. Firmly planting their Bible on Top of the American Flag like it was a table cloth.

I still vote both local and federal, but I’m disheartened with the choices and what I see when I am back in the US visiting. It seems people are more self centered than self reliant nowadays. “Me Time” is now the common statement of the day back in the US.

Rajia
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Yeah it’s great…until your child gets kidnapped and his ear sent to you in the mail. It’s great…until rebelious forces knock on your door and shoot anyone who refuses to join them, while the government does the same thing.

America-slamming is so last year.

Maria
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Best. Post. Ever.
..I never laughed so hard. You have and odd (and funny) way to describe things…perfect post.
And you’re right (or at least, I agree with you).