Christians should never use profanity. If you wouldn’t say a word to a priest or to a child then you shouldn’t utter it before anyone else, for we are all striving to be innocent before Christ. Cleaning your mouth may be the easiest way to please the Lord and receive more of His grace.

The old me was a vulgar sleaze. If you’ve read my game books (I hope you haven’t), most pages were soaked in disgusting language. I cannot read a single page of a book like Bang Iceland without wanting to throw it across the room for being an abomination to God. Sadly, the words of those books reflected who I was at the time. Since I no longer want to be that man, I’ve thrown out all the sinful behaviors that he performed, and that includes profane language.

Every time you use a profane word, you crack open the door for the demons to tempt you, because profanity is the language of the demons. No such word is ever used around God’s throne. It’s what the demons use to darken your mind and turn it away from God and onto anger, judgment, vanity, sex, wrath, and violence. Profanity is a crutch for the lazy mind, a tool of the evil mind, and the vomit of the atheist mind. It should never escape the Christian’s tongue, and if it does, it should be confessed before your priest.

I greatly dislike when people curse, but I am but a mere man, struggling in my walk with Christ. Imagine how much God hates it when you use such filth! There is no need to embark on a ten-stop program to stop cursing: simply make the decision to stop and then pray to God for help. He will then make you aware of how sordid your language may have become. For those of you who want to accelerate the process, wear a rubber band around your wrist and snap it as hard as you can whenever you speak a profane word. The pain that your wrist feels is but a shade of what the ears of your receivers feel when you speak such putridity.

There is no excuse to curse, not even in righteous anger. Once you cleanse your mouth, you also cleanse your soul, and while foul words will still occasionally enter your mind, you will know how to block them from exiting your mouth. Don’t rely on your own pathetic strength to help you with this: our Lord Jesus Christ is standing by, ready to purify you as long as you let Him. If one day you see me unleash a rash of profane epithets, I must have fallen backward, because where profanity is heard, sin is not far behind.

Read Next: How To Live A Holy Life

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Fully agree and I've been focusing on removing these words from my vocabulary.

I've got it down to only happening when I'm speaking very passionately about something or something has upset me. That's the hardest part but perhaps focusing on words or phrases to replace the cursing during those moments is a good strategy.

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For years I have streaks where I try not to curse..... But I always relapse. It is surprisingly harder than one would think.

A worthy challenge.

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Don't know how this will go curse words make up 50 percent of my vocabulary. Although it has entered my mind for some reason lately to stop or cut down. It's been in me since my youth so it would be a lifetime habit that will be hard to break. I guess like Roosh said can't rely just on myself for this one.

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I have a question fo author @Roosh - do you also regret your traveling? What's your views now, about this aspect of your past?

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Every time you use a profane word, you crack open the door for the demons to tempt you, because profanity is the language of the demons. No such word is ever used around God’s throne. It’s what the demons use to darken your mind and turn it away from God and onto anger, judgment, vanity, sex, wrath, and violence. Profanity is a crutch for the lazy mind, a tool of the evil mind, and the vomit of the atheist mind. It should never escape the Christian’s tongue, and if it does, it should be confessed before your priest.

I greatly dislike when people curse, but I am but a mere man, struggling in my walk with Christ.

"His mouth is full of cursing and deceit and fraud; under his tongue is mischief and vanity." Psalm 10:8 companion scripture in the New Testament: "Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness." Romans 3:14

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Thanks for the rubber band idea...stopping myself from bad language is a big challenge

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I liked this article about swearing.

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As my spiritual development progresses, I simply don't want to use those words and avoid them almost entirely. I was also a very foul mouthed person, very disrespectful and vulgar, but it's simply clearing out.

Thank God for helping all people that sincerely serve and ask for His guidance.

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Ever since I started to pray my desire to curse went way down. I cringe at the way I used to talk.

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I learned to cuss in Kindergarten, and have always done so since, but it's always situational. I cuss in casual situations around friends, but never in church, and almost never around my parents or extended family, who are all actively Christian. Likewise, I avoid cussing in a professional work setting.

There one important exception to this. When I learned to cuss in Kindergarten, I started taking the lord's name in vain as a casual part of speech. One time I did this around my Mom, not even thinking anything of it. I knew not to say things like f**k or sh*t around her, but I didn't know there was a problem with taking the lord's name in vain. I was about 6 at the time this happened.

When she heard me do it, she said this was very serious, and one of the 10 commandments prohibits this. I already knew of the 10 commandments from Sunday School, and I immediately took this to heart. Since then, I have almost never used the Lord's name in vain, and if I slip, I regret it instantly and wonder how this even came to mind. I've only had dozens of slips like this over the past 50 years, so it's fairly rare. When my Mom told me this, it seems like it became deeply ingrained in me from the start.

I agree it is best not to curse at all. It only coarsens your speech, not only before God, but even with normal people. It is low class and trashy. However, if you want to start cleaning your language up, I'd say start by eliminating all use of the Lord's name in vain.

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Great point. Not swearing is actually setting of boundaries. If you're an atheist, and you have no boundaries, why not swear? It's just a manifestation of exactly that one point that differs those who have a religion in general and those who do not, for with the former not everything goes, as it does with the latter. When I swear I try to correct myself almost instantly and it works.

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Cleaning up my language is something that I began a few years ago .But even when I was young I made it a point to not use the Lord's name in vane. I don't like to hear it or even see it written.

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A habit I am trying to break. I know it can be done because I have no problem not swearing in front of certain audiences. Also, I have to admit that, when I utter a swear word in conversation with someone who does not swear, I feel like an idiot.

Thanks for the reminder and the challenge.

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I learned to cuss in Kindergarten, and have always done so since, but it's always situational. I cuss in casual situations around friends, but never in church, and almost never around my parents or extended family, who are all actively Christian. Likewise, I avoid cussing in a professional work setting.

There one important exception to this. When I learned to cuss in Kindergarten, I started taking the lord's name in vain as a casual part of speech. One time I did this around my Mom, not even thinking anything of it. I knew not to say things like f**k or sh*t around her, but I didn't know there was a problem with taking the lord's name in vain. I was about 6 at the time this happened.

When she heard me do it, she said this was very serious, and one of the 10 commandments prohibits this. I already knew of the 10 commandments from Sunday School, and I immediately took this to heart. Since then, I have almost never used the Lord's name in vain, and if I slip, I regret it instantly and wonder how this even came to mind. I've only had dozens of slips like this over the past 50 years, so it's fairly rare. When my Mom told me this, it seems like it became deeply ingrained in me from the start.

I agree it is best not to curse at all. It only coarsens your speech, not only before God, but even with normal people. It is low class and trashy. However, if you want to start cleaning your language up, I'd say start by eliminating all use of the Lord's name in vain.

I agree with this. My upbringing left a lot to be desired, especially concerning the gravity of sexual sin, the importance of obedience to church teaching, and many other things, but I thank my father for teaching me never to take the Lord's name in vain, to the point that it was always basically instinct for me not do that even during the years when I was very far from the Church, and I've probably only done it a handful of times in my life, inexplicably, perhaps prompted by demonic influence. These days, it pains me every time I hear someone casually take the Lord's name in vain - something very common among some of my secular friends.

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Great point. Not swearing is actually setting of boundaries. If you're an atheist, and you have no boundaries, why not swear? It's just a manifestation of exactly that one point that differs those who have a religion in general and those who do not, for with the former not everything goes, as it does with the latter. When I swear I try to correct myself almost instantly and it works.

There's an essay by Orwell where he says f--- will pass into common language within 50 years (it was written in the forties), and he was pretty spot-on.

I was taking a walk by my mom's one day and there were two young teenagers, having a casual conversation peppered with f-bombs. The jarring thing to me was that they were not "cursing," saying something outside polite conversation or because they were angry; they were using it as an normal adjective, just as words like "lousy" have outgrown their original context.

Yet there are still plenty of words that are considered curse words these days. I wonder if part of it has to do with what is censored-- certain words were censored in media when we were young, while those same things aren't now, while racial or gendered epithets are still off the table.

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Eliminating music and entertainment with cursing has been of great help to me.

Keeping company with people that don't curse as well has been beneficial.

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There's an essay by Orwell where he says f--- will pass into common language within 50 years (it was written in the forties), and he was pretty spot-on.

I was taking a walk by my mom's one day and there were two young teenagers, having a casual conversation peppered with f-bombs. The jarring thing to me was that they were not "cursing," saying something outside polite conversation or because they were angry; they were using it as an normal adjective, just as words like "lousy" have outgrown their original context.

Yet there are still plenty of words that are considered curse words these days. I wonder if part of it has to do with what is censored-- certain words were censored in media when we were young, while those same things aren't now, while racial or gendered epithets are still off the table.

The human soul requires taboos. It's built into us to find some things sacred, not to be joked out, and some things offensive and scandalizing. When our instincts about what's right become corrupted, we no longer react to genuinely scandalizing things, we no longer treat as sacred that which deserves to be sacred, but new taboos spring up. So merely distasteful racial epithets become horrendous blasphemies, and perfectly inoffensive, old fashioned expressions are treated as distasteful or worse. It's a bit like how (ethically motivated - are they are any other?) vegans still have a suppressed sense of sin, but since they no longer apply it to its proper objects, they start a new religion where meat is murder.

Then there's this kind of comically absurd virtue-signalling casuistry... it's like a secular parody of what Roosh is recommending.

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Interesting observations. I've never used much bad language. To me, it always felt like the linguistic equivalent of wandering around in public in a "wife beater" tank top and stained pajama pants. Swearing a lot just felt like something losers did, and I always disliked it in entertainment as well.

Fascinating how we all struggle with different types of sins. Drunkenness, bad language, gambling, and lying/cheating others are sins that don't tempt me at all, but sexual sins, anger, and laziness are persistent struggles.

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