I have not been shy about highlighting the fact that seed oil, sometimes called zog oil, is industrial sludge. They should not be classified as “food” and should not be eaten by human beings. Even though seed oils are in everything, it’s not that difficult to eliminate them from your diet. I challenge you to do so.

Imagine someone you know who is self-destructive with how they live. They drive without wearing a seatbelt, use an electric saw without safety goggles, and chop onions with a paring knife. Such a person is endangering themselves in innumerable ways, but I can guarantee that they don’t eat mud, bits of glass, or rat poison. Perhaps they inject themselves with poisons such as coronavirus vaccines or heroin, but they do not drink cloudy water nor eat putrid meat. And yet not a day goes by in this person’s life that they don’t eat toxic seed oils. When I realized the truth of seed oils, I immediately began an effort to rid them from my diet through four practical steps.

Step 1: Finish all the seed oil foods in your pantry

Chances are you have several weeks’ worth of seed oil food in your home, most likely in the form of processed snacks. I don’t like throwing away food, so I extended the poisoning of my body by a couple of weeks so that I could finish all the foods I should have never bought in the first place. This mostly came in the form of Clif Bars, which I would eat after a mild callisthenic workout. Turns out that the bars had “organic soybean oil.” Good try, Clif, but you can make hemlock organic and I still wouldn’t consume it.

Step 2: Read the ingredient labels of everything you buy at the supermarket

Me in a couple of years

The first time you go to the supermarket with the intention of reading nutritional labels to identify seed oils like canola, soy, safflower, and sunflower, you will be depressed, because the bulk of your diet was filled with garbage oil. You will realize that you’ve traded convenience and mouth pleasure for poison, unnecessarily desecrating your body. So begins your education in preparing quick and basic meals using healthier fats (butter, ghee, pork lard, beef tallow, extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil) and single ingredient sources. Thankfully, there are a billion food blogs and YouTube cooking channels that make it effortless to learn. Even I have published a recipe that is the length of a novella.

Step 3: Research the ingredients of your favorite restaurants

All chain restaurants have a “Nutrition” section on their website that lists all the synthetic and unnatural ingredients they use in their “food.” For the restaurants you frequent, check out the ingredients in the meals you usually order. I’ll save you some time: they are all loaded with seed oil. If it’s a chain restaurant, they use seed oils by the rusted barrelful. (The only chain I’ve found that doesn’t use them excessively is Panera.) If you’re a foodie and go to high-end restaurants, chances are you’re safe, because they tend to use butter and extra virgin olive oil.

A few months ago I was dragged to Waffle House. When I watched the disgruntled cook ladle neon yellow soybean oil onto the grill, I knew my body would not agree with the food (it didn’t—I experienced heart palpitations that very night and had trouble sleeping).

I went to the Applebee’s website and picked a random dish, the Bourbon Street Chicken & Shrimp. Here are the actual ingredients:

Garlic Mashed Potatoes: Garlic Mashed Potatoes: Potatoes, Milk Blend (Milk, Skim Milk, Canola Oil, Cream, Datem, Water, Salt, Artificial Flavor, Vitamin A Palmitate And Vitamin D3 Added), Water, Margarine (Soybean Oil, Water, Salt, Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil, Mono And Diglycerides, Soy Lecithin, Potassium Sorbate (Preservative), Natural And Artificial Flavor, Lactic Acid, Beta Carotene (Color), Vitamin A Palmitate), Margarine [Canola Oil, Water, Palm And Palm Kernel Oil, Salt, Whey Powder (Milk), Vegetable Monoglycerides, Soy Lecithin, Potassium Sorbate (Preservative), Artificial Flavor, Citric Acid, Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D3, Beta Carotene], Cultured Buttermilk, Buttermilk Powder, Whey Solids, Natural Flavor, Monoglycerides, Roasted Garlic, Citric Acid, Potassium Sorbate, Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate and Titanium Dioxide (color), Parsley: Parsley, Grilled Chicken Breast: Boneless Skinless Chicken Breast With Rib Meat, Water, Seasoning (Salt, Onion Powder, Yeast Extract, Garlic Powder, Chicken Broth, Sugar, L-Glutamic Acid, Disodium Inosinate And Disodium Guanylate, Lactic Acid, Dextrose, Citric Acid, Grill Flavor (From Sunflower Oil), Artificial Flavor, No More Than 2% Silicon Dioxide Added To Prevent Caking), Modified Food Starch, Sodium Phosphates, Soybean Oil, Grilled Onions: Onion, Liquid And Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Soy Lecithin, TBHQ And Citric Acid (Preservatives), Artificial Color, Dimethylpolysiloxane (Anti-Foaming Agent), Salt, Dehydrated Garlic, Spices, Soybean Oil, Not More Than 2% Silicon Dioxide Added To Prevent Caking, Sauteed Shrimp: Shrimp, Water, Salt, Sodium Bicarbonate, Sodium Carbonate, Sodium Citrate, Soybean Oil, Seasoned Mushrooms: Mushrooms, Liquid And Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Soy Lecithin, TBHQ And Citric Acid (Preservatives), Artificial Color, Dimethylpolysiloxane (Anti-Foaming Agent), Garlic Butter Sauce: Liquid And Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Salt, Natural & Artificial Flavor, Soy Lecithin, TBHQ And Citric Acid (Preservatives), Artificial Color, Dimethylpolysiloxane (Anti-Foaming Agent), Liquid Margarine (Soybean Oil, Water, Vegetable Mono & Diglycerides, Salt, Natural Flavor (Milk), Vitamin A Palmitate, Vitamin D3), Garlic, Anhydrous Milkfat, Spice, Contains Less Than 2% Of Each Of The Following: Salt, Natural Flavor, Natural Extractive Of Turmeric And Annatto (Color), Garlic, Water, Citric Acid (Preservative), Salt, Spice, Garlic Powder, Sunflower Oil (Flow Agent), Blackened Seasoning: Spices, Salt, Dehydrated Onion, Dehydrated Garlic, Dextrose, Celery Seed, Soybean Oil (As A Processing Aid), Cajun Seasoning: Spices, Salt, Garlic Powder, Paprika, Onion Powder, Modified Corn Starch, Caramel Color (Class Iii), Disodium Inosinate, Disodium Guanylate, Medium Chain Triglycerides, Artificial Flavors, Natural Flavors, Less Than 2% Each Sunflower Oil And Silicon Dioxide As Processing Aids

Can this dish even be considered food? I rather eat a meal of bread and salt.

The safest food to eat out is the humble deli sandwich. Yes, the bread will have some seed oil and high fructose corn syrup, and the meat will have various chemical preservatives and even seaweed (carrageenan), but it’s better than typical chain-fare. I tell you that I may never eat French fries again in my life, which are fried in rancid seed oils. The idea of eating French fries has become abhorrent to me.

Step 4: Prepare all of your meals

I eat approximately 14 meals each week. Either I or my mother prepare 13 of those without the use of seed oils, and the fourteenth meal is the Sunday fellowship lunch at church. There is not a whole lot of variety in my diet, and during long Orthodox fasts I’m sustained almost entirely on peanut butter, bread, and potatoes, but because I’m not poisoning myself, I’m not worse off than seed oil eaters who eat a “variety” of foods laced with inflammatory chemical agents. After reducing my heart palpitations through functional changes to my lifestyle, I’m in exceedingly good health outside of creaking knees and a sensitive lower back, but I would not be upset if it was God’s will for me to contract a severe affliction, because the point of life is not merely good physical health. Perhaps I get more pleasure from my seed oil strike at disobeying the will of the oligarchs who are determined to make me eat like a farm pig than any perceived health benefits, because it turns out that one day I will die no matter what I eat.

It’s effortless to become neurotic with food. After discovering that seed oil is sludge, I went too far and become slightly obsessed with every little thing I ate. I’ve since come back from that and have adopted a middle path where I only have one overall food rule: no seed oils. I find that that rule alone is sufficiently keeping my diet clean enough to stay in tip-top shape to serve my duties before God, that it doesn’t matter if I don’t eat bone broth, organic beef liver, raw milk, cod fish oil, and all the other trendy hipster foods that are supposed to prolong my life. If the only rule you have when it comes to food is no seed oils, I guarantee you will be in the top 5% of healthy eating with no additional effort, even if you eat cake every day (that you bake yourself with expeller-pressed avocado oil instead of seed oil), because a diet without seed oils will automatically exclude the most processed trash.

Now I must confess that there is one type of food I eat that contains minute amounts of seed oil: roasted mixed nuts. I imagine I’m eating one or two drops of seed oil a day because of it. I love nuts and must eat nuts. I’ve considered roasting my own nuts, but I’ll save that activity for my future wife (along with churning butter from our dairy cow and milling our own flour). To eat one food with seed oil prevents me from going over the edge into obsession, and you are welcome to judge me for that. If I’m starving and only have bottles of seed oil laying around, I will not touch them. I imagine that to be like dying of thirst while floating in a salty ocean. I wonder if dirt is more nutritious.

Since undertaking the seed oil challenge, I eat less sweets and restaurant food. While I’m not a bad cook, I often choose to whip up a quick sandwich that is definitely less pleasurable to my taste buds than an engineered Frankenstein restaurant meal laced with seed oils. By loosening my attachment to externally tasty—but internally toxic—meals, I’ve inadvertently aided my Orthodox faith and have been able to lean more on daily spiritual bread for happiness than worldly bread. It also has made prolonged fasts easier since I have less attachment to elaborate meals and feasts.

We should not be surprised that abstaining from zog oil indirectly aids our faith in God. From that we can safely conclude that the poisoning of the food supply with non-food is of Satan. I hope to abstain from more than two drops of seed oil per day for the rest of my life.

Read Next: Vegetable Oils Are Toxic

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In the mid 20th century the Rockefeller foundation spent many consecutive years funding studies on Gossypol - a compound in cottonseed oil that causes infertility. Somehow this oil has found its way in our food supply as one of these junk oils. Just a coincidence I'm sure.

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FYI if you're craving fries, Chick-fil-A and Five Guys both use peanut oil for theirs.

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A very difficult... but a very worthy challenge

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FYI if you're craving fries, Chick-fil-A and Five Guys both use peanut oil for theirs.

The Elite have zero respect for us. They think we are idiots, and they put satanic filth in our food. Best to go as unprocessed as possible, since you're going to need to be Neo to dodge the myriad of individual inflammatory, carcinogenic, endocrine disrupting, and estrogenic compounds in our food.

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The Elite have zero respect for us. They think we are idiots, and they put satanic filth in our food. Best to go as unprocessed as possible, since you're going to need to be Neo to dodge the myriad of individual inflammatory, carcinogenic, endocrine disrupting, and estrogenic compounds in our food.

Completely agree. The good news is that it's not an all or nothing proposition, we should all avoid this stuff as much as possible but it isn't possible for most of us to avoid it 100%, but every bit helps.

I also make fries at home--line a baking sheet with tin foil (optional but makes cleanup easier), coat it with a layer of olive oil and salt, cut one or more potatoes into 1/8ths and arrange the pieces on the baking sheet, put another layer of olive oil and salt on top, give them 15 minutes on one side at 415 (works best if you have a convection oven but not necessary), take them out and flip them, then give them about another 10-15 minutes. You'll have to play with the time and temperature some based on your oven and how crispy you like them, but it's a good start--as good as any fancy restaurant steak fries and much cheaper and healthier.

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I check the labels of every item I buy at the grocery, and always have.
While I didn't know the evils of seed oils until this year, I did have a general rule of thumb that works fairly well as a broad rule.

Look at the list of ingredients. If it is lengthy, or contains ingredients you don't have in your kitchen, do not buy.

I took a cooking class in Italy years ago. The key to Italian food is SIMPLE, FRESH INGREDIENTS.
We made a stuffed pasta from scratch using 4 ingredients (fresh egg, fresh non pasteurized butter, durum flour and sage).
Storebought pasta typically has none of those ingredients, but a lot of other fillers.

That Applebees meal above is insane, and no Applebees chef is mixing together 100 ingredients. No, he is combining maybe 3 or 4 boxed and bottled chemicals and processed foods with the (probably frozen) meat.

I too love mixed nuts, and enjoy snacking on popcorn a couple of times a month. I don't know how much palm oil is in popcorn, but I did see an Avocado oil version of Orville Redenbacher's the other day.

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100% agree with this. Safest oils are animal fats (butter, ghee, lard, tallow). I mostly use lard because it is far cheaper than ghee. Olive oil is OK, if it is real…most of the inexpensive olive oils are fake and actually toxic soybean (vegetable) oil. Even with lab testing it can be difficult to tell the difference. I think California olive ranch and some high end brands are safe. Same thing for supermarket honey…much of it is counterfeit Chinese high fructose corn syrup…again, hard to tell the difference even with lab testing.

Duck fat roasted potatoes are a great substitute for fries!

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Awesome article, I would be interested in learning how to make changes when energy and time are obstacles.

Multistep process that's easy to do while working fulltime with commuting many hours per week.

This is important enough to hire someone to help out, isn't it?

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I just read the PureProtein bar wrapper from earlier today's ingredients.

Wow. Modified palm kernel oil, (...) palm oil, (...)canola and palm kernel oil one more time and modified palm oil again.

Wow. Carageenan is also in there, meh!

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I've been trying to do this for a long time and you have to replace tons of things that you have in your daily diet. Soybean oil is in almost everything. Mayo, dressings, condiments, anything that comes in a bottle is probably going to have a seed oil in it. To make your own replacements, an incredibly helpful book would be Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon and Mary Enig.

The beginning has a ton of cited essays showing how bad the American diet is, and how we got here eating seed oils, forgetting organ meats, corn syrup, etc. The rest of the book shows you how to make your own broths, sauces, mayos, pretty much almost anything that we eat today.

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We mostly use coconut oil - you can get it with the coconut aroma removed. Very healthy and great to cook with.

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100% agree with this. Safest oils are animal fats (butter, ghee, lard, tallow). I mostly use lard because it is far cheaper than ghee. Olive oil is OK, if it is real…most of the inexpensive olive oils are fake and actually toxic soybean (vegetable) oil. Even with lab testing it can be difficult to tell the difference. I think California olive ranch and some high end brands are safe. Same thing for supermarket honey…much of it is counterfeit Chinese high fructose corn syrup…again, hard to tell the difference even with lab testing.

Duck fat roasted potatoes are a great substitute for fries!

When Christmas comes around, I always look for potatoes, and other goods, in goose fat.

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I don't know how much palm oil is in popcorn

Palm oil is technically not a seed oil. From my research, it's one of the safer newfangled oils. The issue with palm oil is more the quality and what it's adulterated with.

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Palm oil is technically not a seed oil. From my research, it's one of the safer newfangled oils. The issue with palm oil is more the quality and what it's adulterated with.

Nutiva is an excellent brand of palm oil, but a bit pricey. I use it to make popcorn.

I got off seed oils 15 years ago. I look much younger than my peers; I assume the oils I use (animal fat, avacado, palm and occasionally olive) are a major factor.

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Palm oil is technically not a seed oil. From my research, it's one of the safer newfangled oils. The issue with palm oil is more the quality and what it's adulterated with.

I'm glad to hear that. I'm in Africa at the moment and the primary oil they use is palm oil that they extract and process themselves. It's red, like tomato sauce.

You can't get good mayo here though, it's all made with soy and cotton seed oil. Very depressing.

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In the mid 20th century the Rockefeller foundation spent many consecutive years funding studies on Gossypol - a compound in cottonseed oil that causes infertility.

That's an anagram of "goy slops".

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I just read the PureProtein bar wrapper from earlier today's ingredients.

Wow. Modified palm kernel oil, (...) palm oil, (...)canola and palm kernel oil one more time and modified palm oil again.

Wow. Carageenan is also in there, meh!

My grocery store (Harris Teeter) sells delicious cookies and cream keto bars, I was eating them about every other day for a month or so until I looked at the box one day....4 or 5 different types of seed oils and the protein is soy. Now I have a box and a half of them taking up space in my pantry that I can't bring myself to either eat or throw away.

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100% agree with this. Safest oils are animal fats (butter, ghee, lard, tallow). I mostly use lard because it is far cheaper than ghee. Olive oil is OK, if it is real…most of the inexpensive olive oils are fake and actually toxic soybean (vegetable) oil. Even with lab testing it can be difficult to tell the difference. I think California olive ranch and some high end brands are safe. Same thing for supermarket honey…much of it is counterfeit Chinese high fructose corn syrup…again, hard to tell the difference even with lab testing.

Duck fat roasted potatoes are a great substitute for fries!

Also check ingredients on condiments, pre-made pasta sauce, stuff like that....the base variety is usually loaded with seed oils and fillers but they often sell a more expensive version made just from real food/seasoning.

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When I lived in a large city I consumed very little to no seed oils. I was cooking at home, using mostly butter, sometimes olive oil and lard.
Now that I have moved to the countryside with my grandmother I eat cheap sunflower oil every day. She absolutely hates the taste of olive oil (even threw away one expensive bottle), refuses to cook with butter (says it is a high class luxury) and rarely remembers to use lard. It is ironic, because she used to have milk cows and raise pigs for meat. We now have two goats and drink raw goat milk every day. We have hens and ducks. We always cook at home, never go to a restaurant, never buy pre-made foodstuff. But I cannot convince her to stop cooking with sunflower oil (and she does use a lot). I think the real reason behind her attitude is that her parents (who were real peasants) used to make their own oil. Almost everyone had a field with sunflower oil or pumpkin and after the harvest they would go and rent the services of the village's oil press. (In the same way they would mill their flour.) She still has memories about how good and rich that oil was, and nothing would convince her that today's oil is unhealthy. I don't want to fight with her and impose on her my picky, city habits. If I will get sick from sunflower oil, I will try to accept it as God's will.

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