Travelvice III

This is part three of an interview with Craig from Travelvice. Read parts one and two.

You have mentioned your son, who was the result of a relationship that started in Lima, Peru. It does not seem like you will move to Peru full-time. How do you balance being a new father with your travel lifestyle and what role do you see in your son’s life? Also, do you think that based on your son’s exotic background he’s going to do very well with Peruvian girls?

Tatiana IYeah, Aidric’s a stud. At 13 months he’s got more stamps in his passport than most Americans, and gets more positive attention from females than the best looking guy at a bar. For him, this is only the beginning of a life sure to bring an excessive amount of ladies, love and travel into its fold.

Lord help me (and my mental state) if I move to the U.S. or Peru full-time. So long as I’m not physically crippled in some form that keeps me from running or crawling away, I won’t be found in this situation. Even then, chances are good that I won’t be found in either of these places for more than a few weeks at a time every few years.

So yes, this attitude always begs the question: Where will you raise your son? Where will he go to school? Where will you or he this or that?

These answers will come with time.

It’s true. This isn’t an easy lifestyle for individuals or families. And I truly don’t know for how many months or years I’ll continue to keep it up. Personally, I love it to death, but I’ve certainly got a tolerance for it that others don’t.

The pace will continue to slow as time progresses… three months in a country or city here, six months there. Maybe one day I’ll even find a place that captures me enough to keep me there longer than a handful of months—that’s hard to envision now, but hey, so was being a father.

Aidric has been very fortunate that in his first year of life both his parents have been available or by his nearly every hour of every day. I’m a full-time traveler, but a full-time father first. Sometimes I need remind myself of such things when the distractions of travel and life start pulling your attention in different directions. This balance can be very, very difficult. You must adapt or risk everything (should you decide not to, or find yourself incapable).

Tatiana and I aren’t together simply because of our son. She’s told me as much, as have I her. And I hope to have Aidric by my side as often as possible as he grows. There will be times when he returns to the Americas with Tatiana and I don’t. There will be times when I go into some deep part of Africa and won’t allow him to tag along. I’ve an unquenchable thirst for life outside the U.S., and that will continue to be a part of my life for many years to come, just as Aidric and Tatiana will continue be a part of that life.

The nomadic familyAnd as for Aidric’s love life when he’s of age? Oh man, heaven help those poor girls. A true international man of mystery that will speak many languages with perfect fluency (and carry at least as many passports to match—three at current count). He’ll have the insights of his terribly-experienced parents, and that of years of exposure to different nationalities. They won’t stand a chance, Peruvian, Swedish or otherwise.

Without a doubt, this will be one interesting fellow when he’s older.

A problem of boredom often comes up with long-term travelers. Now that you are traveling with your son, has that problem been mostly eliminated? With him are there things you can’t do now that you could before?

Here in Turkey, an elderly traveler told me a rather entertaining line the other day: “The only people that get bored traveling are boring people.”

It’s true, travelers need projects to work on while they travel, least they become unsatisfied with their ample free time. Each successful long-term traveler has their own style of projects, or what they even consider a project. But we all do them. We have to do them.

I think I would’ve gone nuts if I didn’t have a travelogue as a creative and emotional outlet during my first two years of travel. But things are different now. Traveling with another person allows you to vent and explore oddities without the need of writing to get them out of your system.

Adding my son into the travel mix of adds a crazy amount of stress and repetition. I think boredom now comes in the form of having to adopt an undesirable routine (like making baby food by hand, waking up by his schedule not yours, changing diapers, lugging around supplies, etc). Every parent must endure the pains of repetition in this manner, but we get the burden of having to reengineer or make it work at a basic level all the time because every week (or more) we’re in a new home. You’d think it’d add flavor, but it just adds stress.

Having an infant certainly limits you, but on some levels expands your opportunities. Do I think I would’ve successfully hitched onto a yacht in the Caribbean, lived in a banana plantation in the middle of nowhere, jumped off jungle waterfalls, snuck into Machu Picchu, or even participated in a Brazilian carnival the way I did if I had a child in tow? Hell no. Likewise, gone are the days of anonymous vaginas and risky sex in public places. How on earth am I gonna manage to do that now?

But having a child opens up doors to homes that might be otherwise closed. I’m less of a threat with a son and girlfriend with me—not that having a friendly smile didn’t open doors previously—and I certainly get away with photographing locals more often when Aidric’s strapped to my chest. I think in my upcoming travels to India, being a family man will alter my experience in the country dramatically compared with other solo travelers.

Tatiana IISo yeah, I miss out on some wacky adventures, but I guess I’ll never know what paths I would’ve walked down that I’ll be walking now. Maybe these are the better paths? Who knows.

Long ago I came to terms with the idea that you can’t see and experience everything, but to appreciate what you do. This is just another extension of that philosophy.

You’ve mentioned you cook most of all of your meals, and I’m assuming it’s not spaghetti and tomato sauce like I see all other gringos make. Can you share one of your favorite recipes that is easy to whip up in hostel kitchens?

In Latin America, probably three meals out of four were purchased and eaten on the street. In SE Asia, finding a kitchen is about a rare as finding an actual hostel. CouchSurfing here in Eastern Europe and Turkey, that’s where the kitchen-time has been accruing at levels I haven’t known since 2005.

For me, the biggest problem with cooking your own meals is that buying the little spices and niceties necessary to make a ‘fuel meal’ a ‘good meal’ cost. I’ve not only got to buy them, but then carry them if I don’t use ’em up (least I lose that investment). So, why spend $5 on ingredients for a meal when I could just walk down the street and eat a skewer of something that looks like meat for a dollar? In SE Asia, it’d be silly to try and cook for yourself, given the abundant, diverse and inexpensive cuisine out there.

But, there are times when homemade meals make for good conversation and company. I loved cooking in groups in Latin America—especially for a group of women. Getting several people in on the deal makes it affordable, delicious and social.

CONTINUED: Travelvice Recipes

Related Posts For You

newest oldest most voted
craig | travelvice.com
Guest

I must warn you with the Latinas though! They want nothing more than to make their men fat! A well-fed man equals a good woman by his side in their culture! 🙂

craig | travelvice.com’s last blog post: Turkish Paper Marbling.

jkc
Guest
jkc
Offline

that chick’s got a hella nice rack.

virgle kent
Guest

Damn son, these last three post have been increadible! Thanks for this interview, at first I couldn’t really understand your need to peace out… now I do

The G Manifesto
Guest

Craig gets my nomination for “G of the Week”.

And I don’t give out those lightly.

– MPM

The G Manifesto’s last blog post: The Top Ten Hip-Hop Tracks of All Time.

dalair
Guest
dalair
Offline

You definitely lucked out with that girl..she doesnt look like the average peruvian

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
Offline

Where does the $ come from? Parents?

There are some who can wanderlust because they truly don’t give a damn and there are some who can wanderlust because deep down they know there is a safety net of security in the form of an inheritance coming down the line.

The G Manifesto
Guest

“Where does the $ come from? Parents?”

I think he said he was living on $7,000 per year.

You can find $7,000 on the sidewalk.

– MPM

The G Manifesto’s last blog post: The Top Ten Hip-Hop Tracks of All Time.

DF
Guest
DF
Offline

My Dad was formerly a diplomat, there is much value added to a childhood that is constantly in motion. You learn to adapt very quickly and yes, you do grow up speaking many languages. Its easy to romanticize such a lifestyle but there are some caveats. I don’t remember many of my childhood friends and those that I do, I have lost touch with so long ago that they might as well think of me as dead given the number of times I’ve moved. I contrast that with many people I know that have had friendships since they were in pre-school. That time span creates truly lasting and rock solid friendships under which loyalty can truly be tested. As a substitute, my own cousins and siblings are the closest “friends” I have but those are blood ties. I always feel like I’ve made nothing more than a string of transient acquaintances throughout my lifetime and for a man, having a solid friend or friends that last throughout the years are integral to manhood. There’s also a question of identity, which I felt I struggled with that manifests itself in the languages you speak. You spend so much time travelling you don’t ever develop a native accent or your accent fluctuates often depending on the locale. Sounds trivial, but the vast majority of people need to peg you as “this” or “that” so that they can begin to trust you. As cosmopolitan as many care to believe they are, deep down they’re wired to be provincial unless they’ve grown up moving around too.

The G Manifesto
Guest

DF,

Interesting points that are true.

I had many friends as a kid that were Ambassadors kids and Diplomats kids.

Unfortunately, I have little ways to get in touch with them or them with me.

They always had a tough time being the “new kid”.

I am glad I grew up in one place, have a solid foundation and have traveled extensively since I was 16.

– MPM

The G Manifesto’s last blog post: The Top Ten Hip-Hop Tracks of All Time.

Benedict Smith
Guest

minus the kid, that guy seems to have quite the life/experience. gives me quite a bit of the ole’ green eyed monster.

Benedict Smith’s last blog post: “E” is for Escape..

todd h
Guest
todd h
Offline

“You can find $7,000 on the sidewalk.”

not anymore, unfortunately. unless you were walking behind Madoff and a roll fell out of his pocket.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
Offline

poor girl.

z
Guest
z
Offline

They make a lovely couple and appear to be a happy family.

Gunslingergregi
Guest
Gunslingergregi
Offline

Save 42 grand buy two houses in my former area and make 16800 a year rent. Better yet save 110k and buy 5 then make 42k a year. Should be able to chill on that. Just when you get to the 110 don’t try to double it on margin and loose it all to start over it is not as romantic as you would think. Although it does feel cool to make trades in the 100k range. Just do it the easy way one time and done lol The hard way to get an income is the stock market and get rich quick schemes/gambling. Plus on the good side it is not necesary to achieve financial independance. My wife wo can not read has proven that anyone can get rich even with what most would think would be a severe impairment to it. Of course me who learned all about how to beat the market in an economics project has consistantly got ass stomped in the real market because you can make a 100 percent for 10 years but if you leave the money in; at any time you loose a 100 percent you just lost all the gains you made and principle. If I never would have gone to college and learned about stock market I probably would have got houses paid in cash and collecting a rent check. Oh well. Sometimes you have to learn from what you see works not what you wish would work or read about working.

Gunslingergregi
Guest
Gunslingergregi
Offline

Then get a loan and buy 5 more to make 84k a year but who wants that much money lol

Gunslingergregi
Guest
Gunslingergregi
Offline

Something any couple in US could do if they worked as a team in about 4 years. But yea too bad life doesn’t work like that.

Zictor
Guest
Zictor
Offline

DF,

Although many of your points are true, I don’t agree with the way you finished your comment.

“As cosmopolitan as many care to believe they are, deep down they’re wired to be provincial unless they’ve grown up moving around too.”

So, you are saying that unless people grew up the same way you did, they are not cosmopolitan? I would imagine that one could be classified as “cosmopolitan” based on a certain mindset, not on rules related to how you grow up.

Sorry, but this doesn’t seem very fair to me, nor very “cosmopolitan”.

owen
Guest
owen
Offline

Roosh and Craig,

I lo ve to read Roosh’s blog but you two have really topped the usual these past few days. Good job.

RW
Guest
RW
Offline

Even a homely North American chick does not aspire to raise a family with a guy on 10K a year. So that really means South America where converted those dollars are livable.

One friend some years back who questioned his desires for travels had a great explanation from another childhood friend. He said go do it and when you get back, everyone will still be doing the same thing. He was right. I was part of that everyone. Meanwhile this guy had been to some great places before he landed up meeting some girl and having a kid. So he got a broader view of the world and the experiences with it.

Wonder if the Swedish model of cradle to grave government is your daddy plays any role in the backdrop here. The government is also literally the daddy too as out of wedlock births there are very high (the US is catching up) and the government is the fail safe from family type responsibility.

What little we do know of such scenarios domestically is a lot of suffering for the children. In the US, it launches the children to the highest risk of living in poverty and landing up in jail.

Not suggesting that is the case here. Sometimes people forget that there are changes in people over time and as an example many self-claimed hippies in the 60 actually became small business owners. Others took their esoteric college degrees went back and became implanted in the American education system. With not so good results for America, re: Bill Ayers, but that’s a story for another day.

The American model is certainly not ingrained in those raised in other countries. Work 50 weeks and take two is completely foreign to most of the planet.

DF
Guest
DF
Offline

Zictor, I was speaking in general terms, not absolute. If however, you took offense to that personally despite the fact that I was not addressing you at all then you need to build tougher skin because I quite frankly don’t care what is fair to you.

Zictor
Guest
Zictor
Offline

DF,

I didn’t take offense. I just disagree with what your concept of cosmopolitan is. And I see no need to be so aggressive.

Peace, bro.

Zictor
Guest
Zictor
Offline

RW,

I don’t think simple conversion tables could explain what girls want for the rest of their lives.

Still, I imagine people prejudge craig a lot. There are 2 main reasons not to travel with babies: 1) it’s cumbersome and it can be risky.

Craig has proven it’s not that risky and he doesn’t mind either. So, I would expect him to still have some 4 or 5 years ahead of him before his kid needs any sort of former education. Maybe then he will decide what’s best for his son, together with the mother.

craig | travelvice.com
Guest

Here’s another popular traveling family (though with an exceedingly greater budget and different lifestyle): http://www.soultravelers3.com/about-us.html… but you get the idea. No reason not to teach the kid yourself, especially at the earlier age levels. 😛

craig | travelvice.com’s last blog post: Turkish Government Cancels New Year’s Eve.

Rajia
Guest
Rajia
Offline

I would only add that all the people I know who spent their childhood in constant motion are now arrogant adults who still manage to be very self-conscious and unsure. They do not know how to have normal, social relations with people because they never had long-term friendships. They cling to their parents and siblings in an unnatural way. And contrary to popular belief, someone who thinks themselves really interesting and worldy is usually someone no one wants to be around for very long. It gets old to be constantly “un-upped” by someone who has done everything and been everywhere.

Anonymous
Guest
Anonymous
Offline

Goddamn that chicks fugly, woah don’t want to see that face at night

Medieval Fantasy
Guest

Wow, no comments in 8 years. Nonetheless, I’ll drop my thoughts on this.
I have stumbled upon Craig’s travelogue. Planning to take the road and live the adventurous life.
Craig’s site made me depressed, though. You can see that there are no posts after he got married.
Proof that marriage and kids are indeed incompatible with the travel lifestyle?
I have a 10 years old daughter, she is what I most value and love, but she does not live with me. I get to see her in 15 days intervals, and the time she spends with me is the highlight of her life. I may not be 100% present, but the time we have together is quality time.
But I am in a dilemma. In the next years, I am planning to spend at least 4 months, each year, traveling. I do not know how harmful this is will be for my daughter, since she emotionally relies on me so much (her mother is a real shrew. Yes, formerly beta rookie mistake. I took the red pill since). I do not want my daughter to have daddy issues. She is precious to me.
Craig’s silence after his marriage, though, got me thinking…
Sorry if it is offensive, Craig, but I read your travelogue and somehow I feel like you had to finally conform to the harsh truth: your adventurous path was abruptly halted by the role you had to assume, that of a husband and father. And that you lived in negation for some time, but you finally had to give up and accept that maybe you can not have everything. It is either family or adventure.
I hope I am wrong.
Sorry for bad English.