What Is Life Experience?

Why do young Americans try to prove that they are more mature than they are? I’m talking about the type that will not hesitate to tell you situations they’ve been in that made them grow “faster” than their peers.

I had a coworker who would always say he’s worked since 16. Or this girl would always tell me she’s lived abroad and is “different” than girls her age, and another who kept bringing up the painful child divorce and how she had to go to school and work at the same time (the horror!). With all that experience I’m surprised they missed visits to countries where 10-year-olds work on the street for food while living in garbage bag tents next to the bus station. I think in that case they’d find their experience to be pretty damn timid.

I’ve done a couple interesting things but it’s never crossed my mind to use that as proof of my value as a person. Your past doesn’t speak for you—you speak for you. Speaking up your past is the fastest way to get labeled as a “douche” if you’re a guy and a “nerd” or “drama queen” if you’re a girl. It’s like that guy who puts his BMW key chain on the bar in a lame attempt to get attention from females.

In the end there is no substitute for the number of days you’ve lived, whether you spent that “living” abroad in some other country during college or not. There’s the claim of experience and maturity and then there’s who you are. One you can lie about, the other you can’t.

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Lemmonex
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A wad of cash on the bar is more effective than a BMW key.

I do agree with you here. I had a friend who would often talk about how her time in boarding school and traveling to India and how it really made her grow. It just made her sound like an entitled rich kid. She was so conditioned to think this way, she could not even hear how she sounded (though I would often point out her snobbery).

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Matt Savage
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Not sure if I agree with you here. Your past, whether it was 20 years ago or yesterday is all part of your life experience. Everything that you know is because of all that you’ve experienced in the past. So how can you speak to anything without referencing or drawing from your past experience? I don’t know, maybe I’m missing the point on this one.

I do get that people who offer up some sob story about how tough they had it in life, bla bla bla, is simply trying to prove their value or get attention. In that case, yes it’s pretty lame. But to discount your experience completely would turn you into a pretty boring person, no?

Matt Savage’s last blog post: How I Made a Debt Collector Cry.

jen
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Isn’t this post contrary to your advice posts and why you know better because you’ve played your game in other countries?

it seems like you’re calling yourself out.

Anonymous
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I’m glad this post is free, cause it’s totally useless. Number of days you’ve lived? Who cares. Why don’t you write about having ten fingers next — “I wonder why people show off they have ten fingers?”

Jamie
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“In the end there is no substitute for the number of days you’ve lived.” Disagree completely. You really don’t think that someone who’s traveled, or has read a lot, or has had interesting experiences and met interesting people, will have greater depth of character than someone who’s just sat behind a desk, or alternatively sat behind a television smoking weed, for half of their life? Come on. Maturity and character come from experience, not from years.

“It’s like that guy who puts his BMW key chain on the bar..” You’re just bitter because you don’t get any action from your Kryptonite lock key.

GJ
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Slightly confused here, because I know that you’ve written in the past Roosh that travel, experience, etc, is what differentiates someone from the striped shirt pomade gelled hair Harvard law graduate DC-ite at any white-guy bar in Georgetown (who loudly proclaims these things).

I suppose at a certain level it’s delivery– anyone who uses a venue to start bragging comes off as a shmuck, but stories of travel without using it as self validation is good.

suicide_blond
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BMW keys are for douches… if its not italian and fast…keep it in your pocket
xoxo

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Crotch Sniffa
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I gotta call b.s. on this one. You complain that most people have no self identity, but when they do share stories of experiences that shed light into characteristics thats shaped individual value system/outlook you still have a problem?
I think thats great to learn people and the experiences they went thru, what they learned from it, what they failed at. It humanizes people and makes them seem much more grounded (normal). Its the people that don’t share who they are and what they believe in that I find shallow.

virgle kent
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I see what you’re saying here Roosh. It comes down to bragging about the travel and experience to convince people how mature and awesome you are. That should be self-evident without needing to be brought up. It’s kind of like being smart or rich, people should be able to tell without you having to brag about your SAT score/ GPA or without you having to pull out a stack of cash.

Actions speak louder than words.

GMoney
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Hey, My BMW key hurts when I sit on it, because it has the key and alarm all together, and it’s too big to put on my keychain with my other keys, that is the only reason I put it on the bar, face up. I guess it depends on where you are, here in Orange County, a BMW is the equivalent of a Honda Accord, it is considered the minimum here, it doesn’t impress, but it doesn’t hurt either, it is kind of like Switzerland, completely neutral. I did have a girl come up and talk to me once because if it. She said “What’s the difference between a BMW and a Cactus? A cactus has the pricks on the outside. HaHaHa. It gave me a good excuse to leave after sex though. She said where are you going? I said I drive a BMW, that makes me a prick remember? Kryptonite key, that’s funny man, cruel, but funny. I can just see Roosh in his 100% Huggable tshirt, asking a chick at the bar, So do you want to go back to your place? I can give you a boost on the handlebars, if you don’t live too far away.

Anonymous
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I think people are misinterpreting this. It is not a question of whether experience is valuable or not, because it definitely is. It is more about how far too many people exaggerate past experiences to prove a point about their personalities, instead of just simply being what they are without having to explain themselves and their greatness.
Also, many of the experiences that people take sooo much pride on because they have made them mature sooo much faster are actually pretty common. Parents getting divorced, living abroad for a short period of time, etc., etc., yes, they make you grow, but it’s not like you’re light-years ahead of the rest of humanity and have become a sort of super-aware, wise being who knows all the answers.
Bottom-line, you’re not that special, especially when you think you are and have to talk people into believing you by relating your marvelous past.

Crotch Sniffa
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So why did you fucks vote for Hillary Clinton because that bitch lies consistently about all her experiences…I’m just sayin….

Generate
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I have a BMW, I put my keys on the bar and it often IS an opener. And yeah, I am an asshole.

Enzo
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I think I’ve lived more days than most on here. And I have a BMW. And a bicycle. No hiptard t-shirts though.

Line forms to the left ladies.

roissy
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BMW keys are for douches… if its not italian and fast…keep it in your pocket

yeah, but that german engineering means better performance and… reliability. but i suppose there’s always a trade-off between form and function.

roosh i get what you’re getting at. chicks especially love to use travel experience as ego boost self-stroking status-preening, but when you cut through the ad copy you learn that what most of them mean by travel experience is drinking coffee in outdoor cafes, lounging on the beach, and getting groped by horny locals. the person who stepped off the beaten path and accumulated experience for the sake of no one but himself exudes worldliness in everything he does.

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namaste
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agreed. i only judge a person by what they do, not what they say they do.

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secret asian man
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I give a chick another two dicks on the handicap for every country she’s been to.

GMoney
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I thought about this some more, and the answer is, we all use whatever we have that we think is an advantage. When I was a poor bodybuilder with great hair, I dressed in a way to accentuate what I had, muscle shirts, tight shorts, long, wavy hair, and I tried avoiding things that didn’t make me look good. I was poor and had a crappy car, so I would make dates in the park, or hang out somewhere near my apartment, so I wouldn’t have to show them my crappie Eagle Spirit. Now that I have money, and a nice car, but have let the body go, and have a receding hairline, I cut the hair short to de-emphasize it, wear clothes that cover up what I used to show off, and I use my nice penthouse apartment and BMW to attract women. Funny thing is, I used to make fun of the old rich guys with the receding hairline and the fancy cars. Now I make fun of the young bodybuilders with no money. We all think what we do is ok, and what everybody else does we hold in contempt, usually because it is something we cannot do, so it has to suck. Non of you tards could honestly say if you had access to a 500k car that you would not cruise around and try and pick up chicks. You tell yourself you wouldn’t, but you would. Even if you have 10 women a day, you could always go for 11, just like Spinal Tap.

todd hackett
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didnt you recently write a travel book?

JC
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If other people are interested in getting to know you , they will ask questions.
THEN you can tell them all about your experiences and travels and “subcommunicate” what you have learnt etc.
By simply volunteering information about experiences , people come across as braggarts, or insecure people trying to make a good impression.

The one thing that people love talking about is themselves … so ask people questions and ideally they will return the favour , if not …. they are self centred and probably not worth your time and efforts.
…unless they are really hot and bangeable.

Jewcano
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I’m curious how you would feel about my last blog post, in this context.

Jewcano’s last blog post: You Are What You Do When It Counts.

teej
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Wow! The comments have pounded on Roosh. From my count only a few people have his back along with his boys Roissy and VK. My truth is that we are a product of our experiences, but we define how we use them. Wanderlust Roosh, who complains of being in a rut and stuck in DC is a product of his as well. I for one enjoy reading what he posts about his journe) (even if I know he only shared a small part of his experiences).

My life’s journey has taught me that worldly experiences does not produce wisdom or knowledge and insight. I have met narrow-minded pin heads overseas who have lived off the beaten track and worldly cab drivers who never left Chicago. I hope I have learned something from both of them and the numerous people I have met in between.

In support of this post, I suspect that Roosh was picking up a vibe from his encounters that told him the people validating their life experiences were not nearly as wise or diverse as they claim. Otherwise he should not and would not dismiss them or miss the chance to engage their views. As the old line goes, your blues ain’t like my blues, so there might be something to draw from someone else’s journey. (Come to think of it, that may be why I like reading this blog).

Since you brought it up, I suggest that Roosh listen to the people who offer their past and push them to think outside of their experiences, but simultaneously push himself to think beyond his experiences as well. We should all ask oursleves and those we meet, why “it” matters and then why again. In doing so, we just might find that there is more to heaven and earth than is dreamed of in our own philosophy. (Apologies to the bard and several blues singers).

gwu
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remember when this blog was consistently funny?

me neither

Joe T.
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Too many white chicks in the DC area front on themselves, no doubt. They buy into the notion that competition and one-upsmanship with men will somehow make them seem more vital or desireable. Yet these very same girls would slam a guy for doing the same, and instantly accuse him of bragging and chest-beating which is “obviously” being done to get her into her panties.

Here’s an idea for ya: nothing any girl could ever do (besides becoming a brain surgeon, an astrnaut, or a bounty hunter), could compare with the lesser exploits of the average adventurous guy like Roosh.

How many attractive 28 year-old white girls from DC would backpack through South America for six months, alone?

I rest my case.

Joe T.’s last blog post: The Beaches Of Uruguay.

WCB
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Joe T – In my opinion these women aren’t even using the one-upmanship to make themselves more vital or desirable. It seems to me that this behavior is merely an attention-whoring technique (that is, yet another shit test that they hope/expect is never “passed”).

Thoughts?

Enzo
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Extended trip out of a backpack. Weekends spent at hipster bars. Transition angst. Blogging about the whole mess. Wow, this has never been done.

This whole thing is an elaborate “BMW keychain on the bar”.

Joe T.
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WCB – I feel you on that. I think you’re right. Basically what they’re doing is setting the “impress me” bar as high as they can — instead of letting guys play that traditional role. You’re right that they hope 99 percent of guys never pass the test by topping their stories. Roissy would say that they’re subconsciously waiting for the 1 percent super-alphas who can.

Game begets counter game ad infinitum, which is one of the main problems of acceding to game. Game is really acceding to female control, doing a marionnette dance to try to impress increasingly demanding masculinized women. It is relinquishing power to women for the sake of our vital urge for pussy, which we shouldn’t have to do. Which is why I am against game.

The need for game is a by-product of feminism. We should do everything we can to restructure society so that game becomes mostly unnecessary, as it is in places like Brazil or Russia, where men are really men and not puppets.

Joe T.’s last blog post: The Beaches Of Uruguay.

Dr K
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I put my BMW key on the bar all the time to get attention from girls. I have to be careful not have to have beer spilled on it though….it costs $145 to replace!

Dr K
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BTW, I grew up with Saddam’s bombs falling around me. Is that life experience?