We live in an age where the authorities label truth as falsehood, and falsehood truth. I can’t take anyone’s word for anything, and have to do my own research on the most trivial of matters, such as if a tablespoon of safflower oil in my cashew butter is going to start a cascade reaction in my body that leads to an untimely stroke. The authorities have abused me for so long that I can no longer trust them. I have to become an expert on everything, and I hate it.

In the past, you became an expert within a specific domain. For men, that meant farming, war, or governance. You spent most of your waking hours perfecting your skill in those fields, and trusted other experts for matters which you did not know. Today, the experts are liars. They will say anything the oligarchs want to keep their jobs and maintain a pleasurable lifestyle. We don’t have experts anymore, only shills, marketers, and traitors to mankind. The “experts” have declared this additive to be safe in food, but they lie for profit, and I must search online for the real story. This takes time and does not guarantee the information I’ll receive is accurate, but if I care the least bit about my health, I have no choice. After doing this for several years, I realize that I don’t have just one job (writer) but several…

Nutritionist — I’m an expert on the poisonous nature of the American food supply. I know that vegetable oils are industrial waste. I know that they put a non-food seaweed addictive (carrageenan) in ice cream and lunch meats. I know that the increase in heart attacks and cancers is specifically due to foods that industry-controlled doctors claim are “healthy.” I know all of this because I spent dozens of hours researching it. I never intended to become a nutritionist, but I’m halfway to getting a degree in the field.

Baker — All I wanted was bread without high-fructose corn syrup, but I could not find it in the supermarket, so I became a baker. I started with a bread machine and have graduated to hand-kneading and using loaf pans. Then I wanted pizza without soybean oil. So I learned how to make pizza. I wanted banana bread and cookies and cakes without the typical sludge they put into them, so I learned how to bake them. I’m not far away from grinding my own flour. I never intended to be a baker, but today I’m almost qualified to open a bakeshop.

Doctor — I was on a pre-med track in undergraduate school before deciding that I did not want to be a doctor, but because Western medicine has become corrupt and murderous, I had to become a doctor after all! I often review scientific studies and data. I’m always researching natural cures, skeptical even of over-the-counter drugs like ibuprofen and loratadine. I look for patterns of side effects in anecdotal reports of “vaccine” treatments. All of these I do because if I let a real doctor, who is trained by the pharmaceutical industry, do to me as he wills, he will dump a load of toxins in my body or make me a pill popper for life. I never intended to become a doctor, and deliberately decided against the field, but if you come to me with an illness, I believe I’d do less harm to you than a real doctor with my apple cider vinegar and baking soda treatment plan.

Dr. Roosh at your service

Astrophysicist — I’m expected to arrive at an independent conclusion on whether or not humans landed on the moon. I’ve watched a few hours of YouTube videos where people examined the pixels of the moon landing video and I have personally concluded that we did not. I also have to decide if the earth is flat like a pancake or round like an orange. I have watched many more videos on the matter, and have decided to wait until my death for God to show me the answer. Nonetheless, in conversations with laymen, I’m expected to share my thoughts on a wide variety of cosmic matters that traditionally would have required at least a decade of graduate-level schooling.

Psychologist — Children of the modern world are severely damaged. Everyone possesses multiple psychological disturbances, ailments, and deviances (myself included). You’re expected to know how to deal with anxiety, anger, lying, deception, addiction, and paranoia, whether within yourself or in other people. You need to read people and have some ability to ameliorate active mental problems. If you’re a man and want to communicate at all with the modern woman, you’ll have to understand what is going on in her mind to establish common ground. If I were hired by a law enforcement agency, I’d probably be good at detecting falsehoods through body language.

Financial Planner — In the old days, I imagine that I’d get paid physical currency, come home, give that money to my wife, and watch her put it inside her little purse. She’d use the money to buy all the needed things for the home while I focus on work. Today, I have to know if the Fed is going to raise interest rates or not, if the real estate market is going to implode soon, which cryptocurrency is best to “invest” in with my hard-earned savings, how to decipher the small print of an attractive credit card offer, how to identify obscure new tax laws that may apply to me, how to measure the current rate of inflation and how that will affect my spending, and on and on. I essentially have to become obsessed with money to carefully guard the money I have. I never intended to become a Jewish banker, but I tell you that today I am forced to have the mentality of one.

Audio-Visual Technician — I only want to live stream once a month. That seems easy enough, but live streaming is so technical that I have a pre-stream checklist of twenty items to avoid seeing the dreaded “I can’t hear you… there’s no sound” in the live chat. The intricacies of properly using a microphone have made my head spin, especially when you consider applying filters like compressors and noise gates, but after several years of streaming, I think I know what I’m doing. I have installed a live stream setup for a church and know how to record speaking events with two cameras and reasonable sound. If you have audio questions, I may be able to help.

Fake Prophet — Not a week goes by that someone asks me—in a tone where it’s clear they will accept whatever I say as fact—what I think will happen in the future. But how could I possibly know? I didn’t predict the pandemic, the Great Reset, the ensuing inflation, or the supply shocks. God has not enlightened me with visions or signs of the future, so the best I can do is look at the past, measure the stepwise advancement of evil, and logically extrapolate what will unfold in the next few years. I’m hesitant to share what I think will happen because, more likely than not, it will put someone in despair, and will not change the fact that one must grow in the faith more than prepare for dystopian scenarios devised in the mind of Satan.

In casual conversation, I’m expected to share my opinion on everything under the sun, but even what I do know is but a drop in the ocean of knowledge. Why must I know everything? Why must I have an opinion on all things? Yet how disgruntled people are when I respond to their questions with “I don’t know.” They ask me again, and I repeat, “I don’t know.” I do not hold the knowledge you seek! I’m not hiding anything from you! And as for your unique situation, of which I have no experience, I do not have an opinion on the matter at all and can offer not a speck of knowledge to your profit. All I am truly qualified to do is evaluate your piece of prose writing and tell you if it’s decent or not.

I try to prioritize domains of knowledge that concern material survival and spiritual growth, but it is easy to veer out of my lane and crash into all that is vain and inapposite. Why do we spend countless hours every week reading articles and watching videos that will have no relevance in our lives just to offer a factoid or opinion during times of idle chatter? I don’t know, but I continue to do it! And maybe it will be you who asks for my thoughts on some random topic. You will ask, “Roosh, is organic milk worth the extra price over non-organic milk? Is it healthier?” You’re in luck, because I happened to have researched that topic, and my answer is…

Read Next: Can Single People Become Mature?

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Good stuff....after the past 2 years I think most of us have to re-examine what the media, government and educational system have been uploading into our grey blobs to become good conforming members of the hive.

It's amazing how much of it all is patently false. I used to commit the sin of mental pride (and still do...it's a hard habit to break). I thought I knew it all. I am now becoming more comfortable that I know almost nothing and I have been lied to my entire existence. I also have to accept that my mind is so easy to manipulate. It's so humbling.

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It's probably the more normal way of living tbh, specialization only became a thing in the 19th/20th century. Your barber could give you some sort of tonic and the furniture makers produced caskets. Doctors would probably kill you, and you were better off taking advice from the old woman on the edge of the village.

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Arthur Conan Doyle, in "A Study in Scarlet", the first Holmes story:

His ignorance was as remarkable as his knowledge. Of contemporary literature, philosophy and politics he appeared to know next to nothing. Upon my quoting Thomas Carlyle, he inquired in the naivest way who he might be and what he had done. My surprise reached a climax, however, when I found incidentally that he was ignorant of the Copernican Theory and of the composition of the Solar System. That any civilized human being in this nineteenth century should not be aware that the earth travelled round the sun appeared to be to me such an extraordinary fact that I could hardly realize it.

“You appear to be astonished,” he said, smiling at my expression of surprise. “Now that I do know it I shall do my best to forget it.”

“To forget it!”

“You see,” he explained, “I consider that a man’s brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones.”

“But the Solar System!” I protested.

“What the deuce is it to me?” he interrupted impatiently; “you say that we go round the sun. If we went round the moon it would not make a pennyworth of difference to me or to my work.”

When I first read this I chewed on it for a while. "What the deuce is it to me?" is a question we could ask of many many things.

A lot of what passes for knowledge today is useless except for preening before others that you have stuffed it into your head.

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Fantastic take and a topic that has been on my mind lately. We learn all things in school that aren't necessary, hoarding of trivial info, not a word about how to live life and what risks life entails.

Nowadays you cannot trust anything that comes out of society. I do everything 100pr opposite or at least I try to. When they say have fun I live seriously. When they say go and develop yourself I stay close to what I am. If they say travel I'm very weary of the positive consequences that'll have for me. When they say there's a new crisis I know for sure that's a fabricated crisis to further the goals of the elite. This rule of thumb will never let you down.

Lastly, accurate point about all the marketing that's going on. Everything in modern society is marketing: politics, corona measures, vaccines, goods. Nothing is with your best interest in mind. The fact that people even can have the thought that the vaccine is in THEIR interest and not in the interest of a multi billion conglomorate is beyond any of my understanding. But why do they want me to take more vaccines? Because their profit dries up if it's only one! Solving the problem is the worst business plan imaginable. How can't people get that?

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I'll add something specifically Protestant (possibly): the Protestant way tends to having to be an expert on everything in the Bible, which is impossible. Better to rely on the traditions of Christendom to fill in the blanks where you aren't well-versed, which is most things. I've noticed this is what people do de facto, though de jure many would not concede the point.

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I am an ignorant man. I have no degree, I don't read the news and I am not interested in information. I don't care to know about nutrition or popular science, I just listen to my body and gut instinct. I mostly work by intuition rather than discursive intellect. To the liberal mind, I look like an uneducated, primitive man. But I know how to plumb, fight, play the drums and make my way through the woods. I also read philosophy for fun, but I haven't met many who share my interest. Since I don't know much about climate change or the situation in Ukraine, I don't know what to talk about to most people who apparently carry some sort of general opinion on everything.

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Welcome to the club, Roosh. All my life I've done essentially the same thing you described - I've studied many different subjects, especially those pertaining to my own physical, spiritual and mental wellbeing.

The difference between you and me is that I wanted to do it. As far back as I can remember, I wanted to know the truth about everything. Unfortunately for me, I also have a passion for informing other people about the truth I've learned, but they don't like it when I do! They reject it what I tell them most of the time.

How ironic that they ask you repeatedly, even when you don't know, but they never ask me, even though I would be more than happy to share what I've learned. Oh well, God has a sense of humor.

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This reminds me of that one meme--

Who do you trust more?

The W.H.O. or a dog dressed as a doctor?

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Isn't the idea more that if you know a lot you should be generally much better than others at predicting things? For me, knowledge without application (prediction, testing, adaptation, "experiencing" in a metaphysical sense) is essentially worthless.

Competence in an area, and knowledge, were only ever useful for me insomuch as I could make a prediction and adapt to life/live better.

I have an aversion to people who won't make predictions (I'm not talking about people on this board), as it reminds me of a worrier, a weakness or wasteful person - why bother following sport, politics, or anything else if you can't analyze and then adapt your behavior in a better way, in order to better yourself and also advise others around that trust your abilities and caretaking?

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Systems of trust once were, but now there are none. Because the systems of trust have been hijacked and cast into the sea, systems of mistrust have taken their place. Our systems of mistrust now force all of us to become "experts" on dozens of fields in order to survive, thus further stretching out the human will and energy to a measly "merely surviving" and rarely growing state. While we may gain wisdom, skill, and survive another day with our newfound information, we do not pose a threat to the status quo simply as a more knowledgeable individual. If we start operating in small crews, where say, in a group of four, one does all the research on nutrition, health, and medicine, one does all the research on construction, engineering, and land management, one does all the research on self-defense, security, and weapons training, and another does all the research on vehicles, computers, and signals, you have your very own 4-man unit that is capable of surviving, growing, and making a dent in the world, at least in the microcosm of their surrounding environment.

You regrow this model from the individual up, through close friends and family, through kin, through neighbors, through communities, and pretty soon the systems of mistrust no longer factor into our lives. I would expand the 4-man group to a 5th and have one man manage all the farming and agriculture on a plot of land, and you have the auspices of your very own civilization. The pyramid is designed to destroy these systems, subvert them in early conception, and even outright prevent these kinds of systems from forming and growing. Once we all put together our own little trust system, our brains can take a break from the overload of having to do everything all the time, and we can begin to grow again. God never intended every man to be a master in a hundred fields. Good men may refuse to master the one field that may be necessary to break this pyramid, the field of brutality. This is the one thing the bad men of the devil also have not mastered, for their zenith of skills lies in deception, not force. They can only apply force when the righteous are weakened, starved, separated, and brainwashed. Every time throughout history when the righteous have forced out the evildoers, it was for divine survival and the continuation of their people, and their faith. We all just want peace and to be left alone, but that will not happen. "You will submit, obey, and live or die when the system tells you to or your existence is forfeit under the sun," is what we're told underneath the veneer of whatever false pretense the clerics of the pyramid give for a man to do this and to not do that. But their time is coming to an end, and whether in the latter days or under the new Kingdom, trust will re-emerge or we will all fall into oblivion.

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I share your frustrations, Roosh (though I'm willing to bet significant amounts that more people ask you things than I).

It seemed incredulous to me that I somehow needed to understand, down to the minutest detail, how anything affected anything in any given hobby.

I've learned to just accept it as part of learning anything.
Very recent example: computers.
Thought process: 'ok, everything has its constituent parts. Constituent parts have parts. All parts have words/labels, labels indicate things... Better learn the central most constituent part.'
'... The... CpU? It has 'central' in the name...'
'No! The motherboard! I am ignorant of them, time for YouTube!'

I've spent the better part of a month just watching and reading on that one part.

Things are advanced in our time, 'precision engineered', takes time to learn.

Forgive me if it was impudent to reply directly as a newbie.

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Reading Roosh never gets old. The artistic "simplicity," the comedy, the hilarious but profound introspection. The fake prophet thing killed me. So true. We love you Roosh we can't help it

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So you have become the polymath.

Not surprising since you have high testosterone levels.

Another person who is like you is Christopher Walker: he is a surgeon, neuroscientist, nutritionist, businessman, painter and bodybuilder.

He used his vast knowledge, skills and creativity to build a business empire called Umzu and he now has a net worth of $120,000,000.

Below is an image of Christopher Walker:

“I’ve always been fascinated with the human body. At age 16 I performed a bladder stone removal surgery on a man in Mexico, and later became the first person to graduate from Duke University’s neuroscience program in just 3 years."

Source: https://www.thechicagoweeklynews.co...-began-his-business-in-the-supplements-world/

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Reading Roosh never gets old. The artistic "simplicity," the comedy, the hilarious but profound introspection. The fake prophet thing killed me. So true. We love you Roosh we can't help it

Roosh has really sharpened his humor over the last year, it's much more subtle, more deadpan.

In regards to the article itself, I assume that when I have to do some digging on a subject (food, for example) it's a sign that God wants me to know certain things; living in ignorance about seed oils or estrogens in the water supply are things that will harm me, and God reveals this knowledge so that I may continue to serve Him in the best way possible. The burden of having to 'know' everything before doing any activity can be tiresome but I believe that it's all part of the plan, the world is a deathtrap if you are not careful and light is needed to guide us through it.
Passing this knowledge onto your friends and loved ones is important.

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So you have become the polymath.

Not surprising since you have high testosterone levels.

Another person who is like you is Christopher Walker: he is a surgeon, neuroscientist, nutritionist, businessman, painter and bodybuilder.

He used his vast knowledge, skills and creativity to build a business empire called Umzu and he now has a net worth of $120,000,000.

Below is an image of Christopher Walker:

Source: https://www.thechicagoweeklynews.co...-began-his-business-in-the-supplements-world/

It’s interesting that after reading an article about reading too many articles that I’m asked to click another article.

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Arthur Conan Doyle, in "A Study in Scarlet", the first Holmes story:

When I first read this I chewed on it for a while. "What the deuce is it to me?" is a question we could ask of many many things.

A lot of what passes for knowledge today is useless except for preening before others that you have stuffed it into your head.

He makes a very good point. I can already feel how my brain has become cluttered with useless trivia and junk from years of being instructed in things that mean nothing to me, and that I only had to remember so that I could pass the exams required to bestow on me a piece of paper that would essentially authorize me to go on to college, where I would have to remember more useless trivia to pass exams in order to be bestowed a piece of paper certifying that I can find work in a certain line of work.

I wish I could defragment my brain's hard drive.

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Fantastic take and a topic that has been on my mind lately. We learn all things in school that aren't necessary, hoarding of trivial info, not a word about how to live life and what risks life entails.

Nowadays you cannot trust anything that comes out of society. I do everything 100pr opposite or at least I try to. When they say have fun I live seriously. When they say go and develop yourself I stay close to what I am. If they say travel I'm very weary of the positive consequences that'll have for me. When they say there's a new crisis I know for sure that's a fabricated crisis to further the goals of the elite. This rule of thumb will never let you down.

Yes exactly these are the reasons why we cannot depend on the "experts", and ultimately we must be able to do self study and find our own solutions. Most of society's accepted wisdom are flat out incorrect.

From self study I found that monarchism are the best form of government, not democracy and republicanism, being nice with a woman will get you nowhere and actually you will be perceived as weak and needy, compound lifts are the best for beginners, Covid vaccines are the real killer, etc. As you can see these are the opposite of what society taught us. As someone once said, if society and the experts lied to us once or twice, then what other lies can they tell us? What if everything are lies?

Ironically from my own experience the best source of information isn't from school, university, or the experts, but from independent bloggers and forums.

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The overwhelmed-distracted dynamic you describe reminds me of Jesus' admonition to bustling Martha at Luke 10:40-41, that, "...only one thing is necessary" (sitting at the Lord's feet, learning from and knowing Him) and also of His prayer in John 17:3 to the same effect, "This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom You have sent." So, while I share your angst at the current tempo of lies pouring from the serpent's mouth (as it were), we have a singular antidote who Has promised not to forsake His own.

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We want to know everything today thus we become endless skeptics. If we are to believe in God, we want a perfectly rational and intellectual justification for doing so.

"Oh, I'm convinced now".

However, this is not the traditional Orthodox attitude. It is much more akin to submission than intellectual justification. First, you submit to those who know better. Your elders, your leader and your priest. Then, to the whole host of saints, angels, principalities and Christ himself. Then you follow Him. Ultimately, God knows best.

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