I don’t go out much these days, but when I do, it’s to the supermarket. I need to eat food to survive, and since I don’t grow my own food, I must buy it from the supermarket. Whenever I do go, assuming there isn’t someone yelling at me for not wearing a face mask, I hear music at a volume that is just loud enough for me not to ignore. For as long as I can remember, the supermarket has played music, not just supermarkets in the Washington DC area but every supermarket I’ve traveled to in over twenty states, and even around the world. Where did supermarkets get the idea to play music?

A professional consultant will claim that the music is amendable to business by putting customers in a desired mood that results in increased sales. A “study” with an N of 24 has deemed it, one that could not have possibly been double-blind or reproducible, and yet it is that conclusion which nearly every supermarket in the United States has willingly adopted without hesitation or protest so that when you go to the supermarket today, you will be forced to hear Lady Gaga and Katy Perry, or perhaps Chicago and Madonna. The music must feature electronic instruments and cherish a false idol such as romantic love or the notion of fun.

Father Seraphim Rose, in his superlative lecture series Orthodox Survival Course, commented that music in the supermarket is not an accident. There’s a purpose, a philosophy, behind it.

The same way with music and art — music especially since it’s so all-pervading in society; you go to supermarket and you get music. There’s a whole philosophy in back of why you get the kind of music you do in the supermarket; and you have to understand what this music is trying to do to you, what is back of it. There’s a whole philosophy to it.

[…]

You go into a supermarket and you’re subjected to music. You go out in the street and you’re subjected to the art — the buildings, the billboards, everything in the streets is the art of our times. And therefore since one has to be subjected to that, it’s better to be subjected to good, refined art than the barbarism which exists today.

Father Rose answers the question indirectly in his lectures: there is music in the supermarket because it takes your mind off God. The kind of music they play is not classical. It’s not Gregorian chant or Appalachian hymns—it’s the kind of music with worldly lyrics entwined in catchy melodies that lack the sort of beauty which would instinctually cause you to glorify God. The purpose of the music in the supermarket is to contribute to your eternal condemnation.

But how could that be? Such a plan would involve a massive conspiracy from the producers of the music, the singers, the distributors, the owners of the supermarkets and their district managers, the store managers, and even the store employees who are responsible for turning on the store music system every day at 8am. It would be impossible to get them to all consciously agree and coordinate to this Satanic plan, and to that sentiment I would agree. Truth is they don’t even know that a plan exists. They are part of the spirit of the times, and by not worshiping their Creator as we were told through the scriptures, they become unwilling participants in the evil one’s incredibly intricate system to condemn the world through every means at his disposal. A thought or impulse from the demons fills agnostic minds about creating or playing the music, and because they are not actively resisting evil and have no immunity to it, they make the choice to fill our ears with sounds that offer no profit to anyone’s soul.

If the music they play in the supermarket is meant to aid in our condemnation, to serve as one drop of water within a large bucket of apostasy, what else out there aims to do the same? Everything. Everything else that you see and experience, that bombards your senses and occupies your thoughts, that keeps your mind and heart away from Lord Jesus Christ, cumulates through these little drops, leading to a disastrous showing of a modern soul on the Day of Judgment.

Imagine the world, if you will, as a children’s arcade, filled with all sorts of games and amusements, but which contain absolutely nothing nourishing of substance. Our entire world, down to every last street, shop, and television commercial, is fashioned like the arcade, but it’s less an arcade and more a pigpen, filled with the stench of evil that we must actively resist, but of which we are doing a poor job. Many people will live and die in the pigpen, and refuse to accept—despite numerous opportunities—that there is an eternal world in the heavens. They will go into the grave as a soul that has not been purified, or one that does not even know what purity is. They went to the supermarket hundreds of times, and heard the music playing, and liked it enough that they wished it was louder. Even when not in the supermarket, they sought out the same music—anything to keep their minds away from the ultimate truth of why they exist—but it’s only when we close our ears to the music of the world do we really begin to live.

Read Next: Is Faith Growing Or Dying?

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As in that famous Calvin & Hobbes cartoon, if we stopped bombarding our ears with music or noise generally we'd start to hear ourselves think. Most people today fear that. Modern man has been trained to hate and be afraid (courtesy of social engineering) of his own personal perceptions, feelings and thoughts, one of the most intimate and beautiful kind of gifts God gives him.

"Everybody is shouting to hide the fear and the shame : fear of being nothing, and shame of believing oneself everything." (Guido de Giorgio)

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This was playing at the grocery store when I went yesterday afternoon. I've always liked this song, but I have to admit it fits the pattern you're seeing.

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I've been taking my headphones into the places I can fit my truck into. It's difficult to go grocery shopping in a semi but I'm usually playing some orthodoxtalks or some classical beethoven or Mozart.

I'm so disgusted with pop culture I'm having to find my own means of cancelling it

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Good article. Reminds me of this similar observation by Roger Scruton.

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Roger Scruton called it "the noise industry". Earbuds with active noise cancellation (I have AirPodsPro and they work pretty well) are worth it, IMO. That said, Aldi does not have any poor excuse for music on at all, which it so much more pleasant with no need to block out the world. If you've ever been to Lee Valley Tools, they have classical music on. It totally changes the experience of the store.

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I always thought it was to demoralize the employees...

The music I had to listen to was always about dysfunctional relationships, or losers. They played the song: "Man who can't be moved" by The Script, a song about a loser who can't accept that his girl is probably off with some new guy, while they don't play the song "Hall of Fame" by the same band, which is about putting in effort into something, and making something of yourself. "Don't try to learn any math or science, or try to learn how to code, don't save your money, or try to invest it... Just keep listening to this horrible music, stocking shelves until you die, for minimum wage,"

The song "Treat you Better" by Shawn Mendes... We joked that song should be the national anthem of the EU... (I was one of three Red Pilled guys working there at one time, some of the best conversations I've ever had to be honest.) We also used that song as punchline of jokes with one another: "Good, you've got a girlfriend now. No need to fear you'll go on a incel killing-spree, driving your car into the Women's Studies Department with "Treat You Better" at full volume!" I also told a young 19 year old coworker about that song: "Be the guy this song is about, and not the singer." I also took the most ridiculous image of Shawn Mendes I could find and added the words: "Writes the anthem of the betas, Treat You Better... Goes to bed every night with different groupies."

"I don't think breakups are that fatal, what with all the songs they've inspired..." (The song "The Way I Tend To Be" by Frank Turner playing at that store did get me through a breakup, then when the song was finished I found my self-respect again.)

"Ed Sheeran... Working hard since 2004 to prove gingers have souls."

"A singer in the band One Direction is a muslim, that really puts a new spin on their song, Steal My Girl..."

"He must've been on some good drugs when he wrote this song..."

"I don't know the name of the song, or the singer, or even the lyrics, but it's the song that sounds like a cat being neutered through its mouth..." My coworker immediately starts singing and dancing to the correct song I was referring to, from just that description alone.

(We had to come up with jokes to get through the shift...)

Here's a deep-dark secret of mine, that I won't even tell my Confessor: Somewhere in the HQ of a pharmacy chain you all have heard of, deep in their basement, stored on their servers, there's security footage of me dancing in the backroom to the song "Diana" by One Direction.

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Roger Scruton called it "the noise industry". Earbuds with active noise cancellation (I have AirPodsPro and they work pretty well) are worth it, IMO. That said, Aldi does not have any poor excuse for music on at all, which it so much more pleasant with no need to block out the world. If you've ever been to Lee Valley Tools, they have classical music on. It totally changes the experience of the store.

Could the noise industry, being controlled by the elite, be their way of rewiring our neurons to accept low frequency radiation? If so, they would need noise pollution culture to 'help' us get used to it.
EMRs being increasingly prevalent since the 1800s, seems to have a continuous background high pitch, and it sounds like tinnitus. There's a growing number of young folk who are complaining about this on social media.

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The messaging of pop music is so debasing that it elicits an immediate reaction if I happen to hear a song. I notice how they cover the lyrics in a catchy beat so you will be likely to recite the lyrics without thinking of their meaning. It is really enlightening when you see the performances that accompany the songs. I saw a clip of the performance on the Grammys by Cardi B, and the performance was a perfect visual representation of the filthy, evil meaning of the song. I had a visceral reaction to the situation, and I can’t imagine how it would affect younger people who are more impressionable. I have never been to any sort of adult club where that kind of behavior is on display, but I can only imagine how demoralizing and demeaning it must be. It is truly a sad state.

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"I'm broken and it's beautiful" repeated 10 times a day, every day, for months on end. Sung by Kelly Clarkson and aimed at young white women.

Such obvious programming.

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Music has become a tool for mass trauma control, leading us out of God's creation of natural sounds into a counterfeit reality of science fiction. We will learn to love our slavery as avatars, except for those whom God keeps for Himself.

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Could the noise industry, being controlled by the elite, be their way of rewiring our neurons to accept low frequency radiation? If so, they would need noise pollution culture to 'help' us get used to it.
EMRs being increasingly prevalent since the 1800s, seems to have a continuous background high pitch, and it sounds like tinnitus. There's a growing number of young folk who are complaining about this on social media.

Anything is possible.

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I stopped listening to radio and all music with lyrics back in the 90's when there was a popular song with Satan in the lyrics.
I would be stuck in traffic and hear all the people in their cars singing "Satan" and it made me ultra-aware of what that really meant.
Nowadays, living alone, I rarely turn on music and I can attest to spending a lot more time in thought and perception.
When I do choose music, I stick to classical and/or 432 hertz instrumentals.
The music that is played in the grocery store motivates me to shop as quickly as possible as it is always offensive to my ears.
After over 20 years without POP music, when I do hear it, it all sounds THE SAME and is literally impossible for me to listen to.

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Do you know what I am enjoying most in some foreign countries?
The fact that I don't understand a single word in their language.

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In fact, God created music commanding us to sing, supporting the musicians in the music they play.
In spite of pagan religions, such Buddaism trying to copy Christian missions in this way for their own recruiting, nowhere in the world is this emphasis on music experienced, in spreading His gospel.

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This is an interesting topic. The majority of today’s music is trash and it has some very negative undertones to it. One interesting thing I’ve noticed within the past two years Is how desensitized most people are to this music. Prior to the COVID pandemic, I used Lyft and Uber a lot during my travels. There were numerous times when I would get inside of these cars and the drivers had hard core Rap and Hip Hop music playing that had pornographic lyrics. This was some really vile stuff.

I had to ask the drivers to seriously lower the volume or to change the music completely. Some were ok with this and some I could sense got annoyed when I asked them to do this. It never occurred to these drivers that the music that they had on was very inappropriate for the situation at hand. This is now becoming more common that other venues are now playing this type of music more often now too. Starbucks and even Target stores are now doing this. It’s just another sign of the decline of our culture and society.

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I listened to this loads in the 90s but fell away from it for a long time. If St Hildegard had been canonized before I was baptized, I would have chosen her as my patron saint. I wear a St Hildegard medal on a rosary bracelet 24 hours a day minus time in the shower (and sometimes even in the shower). If this has no effect on you, just keep listening until it does! Music is one of those "don't get me started" topics so I will try to leave it at that now, except to say that it's very beneficial to go on a musical "diet" now and then to curb the hold of popular music and clear out the brain clutter it causes. ;)

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There were numerous times when I would get inside of these cars and the drivers had hard core Rap and Hip Hop music playing that had pornographic lyrics. This was some really vile stuff.

When I would go to Nashville to do my weekend uber money while I was in school, I'd usually purposefully play Bluegrass and oooooooold country gospel. I wouldn't let patrons change the station either. I got a lot of flack from the Gen Z & fellow millennial types wanting that filth, but the older GenX and boomers loved it.

They would constantly tell me that their experience in Nashville is not what they expected and there weren't enough country music locations to see.

Being that I was just up there to work and not visit, I never really got the modern Nashville experience that they're getting now, and I'm not sure I'd even want to. My personal Nashville experience is with my Granny, brothers, cousins and aunts +uncle's in 1991 going to Opryland, listening to the Grand Ole Opry and eating funnel cakes... I'll choose to preserve that memory instead of replacing it with the modern pop filled garbage of today.

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I have been thinking about this often for the past half year or so. I was once sucked into this world. My Spotify is full of garbage which I continue to delete songs off my saved playlist every day. I want to delete the app entirely but I feel attached...something I'm working on.

I love the beauty of the music in the Catholic church. I could sit there all day long. I am particularly moved by chant, also.

I've recently discovered music box movements/mechanisms. The simple tunes and sounds are so pleasant to the ear. I am considering getting into woodworking and building some of these as you can buy the movements separately.

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